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Columns and Editorials

  • Wildlife has right-of-way on the Alcan

    By Candy Clarke

    Traveling the historic Alcan Highway is always an adventure in itself.

    The highway, built as a joint effort between Canada and the United States during World War II, still serves as the main highway to Alaska. You never know who or what you will encounter around the next curve or at the top of the next hill! It could be incredible scenery, messy road construction, an animal, or interesting travelers.

  • Awed: God takes notice

    A young boy stood in the center of the driveway of his family’s home. Beside him was a small telescope, mounted on a tripod. It was early in the afternoon on a hot summer day. The boy had attached a round, white screen to the eyepiece of the telescope.

    According to the boy’s science teacher, a total eclipse was to happen on that particular day. The telescope with its white screened eyepiece was aimed directly at the sun.

  • 1887: 43.5 acres purchased for $400

    200 Years Ago

    On July 27, 1812, two citizens were before the county court on the charge of breach of peace.  Both were found guilty and fined for their actions (no explanation given).  Peter Troutman was fined $4.17 and William O’Nan was fined $8.

    On July 24, 1812, Isaac Green posted a marriage bond for 50 pounds in order to secure a license to marry Nancy Roberts, daughter of James Roberts.  The bond was co-signed by James Roberts.  The wedding ceremony was performed on July 30, 1812, by the Rev. Isaac Malin.

    175 Years Ago

  • Eminence Guest column: July an unusually busy month for legislature

    July may not be a time normally associated with a rush of legislative activity, but in a key way, no month is busier.

    That’s because it marks the beginning of the state’s fiscal year, and it also is when most of the new laws adopted earlier in the year by the General Assembly take effect.  Unless there is an emergency clause or another specified date, all enacted bills officially go on the books 90 days after the end of a legislative session.  This year, that falls on July 12.

  • Root beer stand brings relaxation

    Driving across country from Kentucky to Alaska is never boring for me. Though I may see many of the same things several times, I am never bored. My husband, Frank, on the other hand, frequently has a “let’s just get there and then we can enjoy” mentality about travel. This attitude, I have noticed is particularly true prior to his arrival at his favorite root beer stand in Fort McLeod in Alberta, Canada.

  • When it come to children and cars, BE SAFE

    In light of the recent tragic and accidental death of 8-month old Lincoln Lindsay in Louisville, we are once again reminded of the danger of the heat in combination with distracted parents.  Lincoln was accidentally left in a car after his dad forgot to drop him off at daycare.  The infant died as a result of heat exposure while he was trapped in the car. 

    You may ask, “How could a parent forget a child in the car?” 

  • Sound advice: to thine own self be true

    We are often told that, if our lives are to matter, we must be selfless, always putting others first.  It’s good advice, but being selfless in a healthy manner is possible only when a person knows him/herself.

    Be selfish.  Take some time to think about yourself; figure out who you are.  Only then can you be a person capable of putting others first.

    In William Shakespeare’s Hamlet, Polonius gave his son Laertes good advice:

    This above all: to thine own self be true,

  • Time to hit the road to Alaska again

    By Candy Clarke

     

    Well, it’s that time of year again. No, I’m not talking about gardening, farming, or boating. This time, I’m talking about packing up and heading for Alaska. As much as I look forward to going home to Alaska, it is very difficult to leave Kentucky at this time of year. We are never quite ready to leave; we always want to stay just another week or two.

  • Insects alive early after warm winter

    By Tracy Harris
    Landmark News Service
    A mild winter and warm spring has more people outside and active — and they have company.
    Ticks, mosquitoes and other insects are active earlier this year due to unseasonably warm weather and medical professionals are advising people to be cautious of themselves and their pets.
    But most pests are just, well, pesky.
    Only the black-legged ticks species carries lyme disease and it is rare in Kentucky. More cases are reported in Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota and the northeast.

  • Lead poisoning isn’t just a thing of the past

    By Katherine Jett

     

     

    Last week the Center for Disease Control and Prevention announced it had revised its more than 20 year old policy regarding lead poisoning in children.

    While lead poisoning may sound like a disease of the past, it is currently the most preventable environmental disease of young children in the United States today.