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Today's Opinions

  • Stand up for the rights of all to disagree

    In a world seemingly awash in political strife, there’s a drip, drip, drip of condescension and negativity that threatens to erode all of our civil rights.

    Of course, the forum front and center in my concern is none other than Facebook, where it’s easier than ever to verbally abuse someone who is different from ourselves or who holds differing beliefs. 

  • The facts back public schools

    Since we became a state in 1792, Kentucky has been committed to education. It is that commitment that led to key education decisions in the Civil Rights movement, the passage of the landmark 1990 Kentucky Education Reform Act (KERA) and the 19-year-old Kentucky Postsecondary Education Improvement Act.

  • This is what democracy looks like

    Regardless of how you voted last November it’s impossible to deny our country is changing right before our eyes. It’s not an overstatement to say that the new administration will not only re-ignite the women’s movement, but galvanize our populous to seriously take a look at civil rights, human rights and religious tolerance.

    I’m motivated on a dozen levels after attending the Women’s March in DC.  

  • Letters to the Editor, March 22, 2017

    Problem with protesters then?

    It appears that Mr. Leon Leonard was disturbed by the recent protests in the county and across the country demonstrating against assorted right-wing policies and politicians. He feels that “the country has spoken with their ballots … and the liberals…can’t come to grips with it.”

  • Charter schools bill on way to governor's desk

    This has been a year for early arrivals at the State Capitol.

    Within a week of the 2017 legislative session’s start in January, bills started arriving in the governor’s office to be signed into law, an extraordinarily quick start for a session of the General Assembly.

    We’ve had more early arrivals at the Capitol in recent weeks as hundreds of the tulips in the Capitol gardens have already started blooming, a couple weeks ahead of their usual schedule.

  • Anger at protests

    In response to Mr. Joseph Yates’ letter published in the March 1 edition of the Local, specifically to the last paragraph, I’d like to comment.  

    Mr. Yates states that he “cannot recall any crowd coming together to demonstrate against a sitting congressman, ever.”  Well, I can’t either, but I believe I can offer some insights.  

  • Flurry of bills move on for passage

    A flurry of activity stemming from committee meetings and the passage of bills marked a short but intense week six of the Kentucky General Assembly. Although the Senate was only in session from Monday to Wednesday of this week, committee meetings still met during the later part of the week to give final hearings to a few select bills.

  • Kentucky moving closer to federal ID cards

    The 2017 session is coming down to the wire, with major legislation still left to consider on two “concurrence” days next week. After March 15, we recess until March 29 and 30, when we reconvene for our final two days to review any gubernatorial vetoes.