Today's Opinions

  • Kentucky provides 2.3% of energy

    When it comes to supplying the energy that powers our country, Kentucky plays a bigger role than most.  We represent just 1.4 percent of its population, but provide 2.3 percent of its electricity.

    The main reason for that, of course, is coal, which was first commercially mined in the Commonwealth in 1820.  Now, only two states extract more annually, and only four depend on it more to run their homes, schools and businesses. Here in Kentucky, it supplies more than 90 percent of our electricity.

  • Quit spreading vicious rumors

    It saddens me greatly to feel compelled to write this letter to the citizens.  Being raised in Henry County all my life, putting 27 years into teaching the children of this county and giving back to the community, I am shocked, but not surprised, at what I have heard.  It has come to my attention that there are rumors going around this county about my good friend, Ricky Doyle Sr.


  • If managed correctly, forests can be a resource that will sustain us

    Our forests may not be one of the first things to come to mind when considering the drivers behind Kentucky’s economy, but they should be.

    That’s because we ship more than $6 billion worth of wood products each year.  More than 22,000 people work in wood-processing facilities across the state, and their combined payroll in 2004 was about double the sale of tobacco that year.

    Forests cover 47 percent of Kentucky’s total 25.67 million acres, but even that impressive amount is down about half of what it was before we became a state.

  • Leave cruisers alone

    I would like to voice my opinion about the cruising.

    I think it was a good thing. It was good for businesses. It was not kept a secret, so anybody that didn’t want to deal with the situation could prepare for them a day ahead of time, or just go around the cruising.

  • Thanks for support of Spring Fling

    I would like to thank everyone who came out to the 28th Annual New Castle Spring Fling on Saturday, June 12.  The rain held off and it was a success!  

    For the full letter, see this week's Henry County Local, available on newsstands across the county.

  • It’s time for residents to speak up

    For several months, members of the Campbellsburg Fire Department have attended the city’s commission meetings, voicing their concerns about the state of the reconstruction of the fire station that burned in March 2009.

    It’s clear that their attendance is no longer sufficient — residents need to demand accountability for completion of the fire station project.

  • How will you spend your $1 today?

    In the age of dollar value menus, dollar stores and 99-cent sodas, we often forget the real value of one dollar.

    Too often, we associate it with something cheap; something that, to be quite honest, probably isn't worth a buck.

    What if that $1 represented the amount of personal energy you have to spend every day?

    Last week, my soul sister shared something she overheard at a Rotary meeting.

    It came up as we talked about the various things people spend their energy on, or, as we were discussing — waste their energy on.

  • Why not consult an ethics committee?

    It seems as if the political witch-hunt of 2010 is underway and P&Z Commissioner Roger Hartlage is in the crosshairs.  While I’m not in support of any person running an illegal commercial landfill, what is underlying here is the rights of a property owner to do personally with their property what they choose, without the government interfering.