Today's Opinions

  • Magistrates made the wrong call

    True leadership means doing that which is right, though it may not be popular.

    On Tuesday, June 20, members of the Henry County Fiscal Court missed a prime opportunity to display true leadership.

    At issue was whether or not the court would remove Roger Hartlage from the Henry County Planning and Zoning Commission. In April, Hartlage and the other members of SBH Properties received a notice of violation from the state that charged the group with having improper fill material on its property.


  • Shop locally with the Henry County Farmer’s Market

    The Henry County Farmer’s Market was founded on the principle of sharing. Producers in the county wanted to share their cropland, their hard work and the fruits of their labor with their friends and neighbors.

  • “Hearts of Grace” thank you

    The community wide “giveaway” outreach event on July 22 and 23rd in New Castle far surpassed the hopes and expectations of its sponsors.

  • Returning to the dinner table

    I’ve taken some ribbing recently from family members. It started a couple of months ago, when my husband noticed something was different.

    As we got ready to sit down at the table for dinner, he asked “So why are we eating at the table so much now?”

    Over the weekend, my own mother expressed some surprise that we were sitting down at the table to eat a late lunch I’d prepared.

  • REINS: A major step to restore Constitutional balance in government

    For too long, Congress has delegated an unwarranted level of authority to unelected bureaucrats in the Executive Branch for major decisions that affect you and your family.

    Members of Congress vote on legislation, but the devil is always in the details.  The details of the legislation, which will directly impact you, are often left for unelected government employees to determine.  This is an all too common occurrence that lets Congress off the hook for major federal regulations that impact your everyday life. 

  • Biggest challenge for school children is health

    For thousands of children attending school, the biggest challenge of the day may not be tied to the classroom, but to their health.

    A little more than 18 months ago, the General Assembly’s Program Review and Investigations Committee began taking a closer look at this issue, to see what more the state might do to help those facing a chronic disease or a potentially life-threatening allergy.

  • House misses mark on financial reform; ignores American taxpayers

    Over the course of the past two years, Americans have lost homes, businesses and jobs, attributable in large part to a lack of effective regulations on Wall Street and in the housing market that led to a series of costly bailouts by the federal government.  Last week, Members of the House were faced with a decision between defending the American taxpayer or continuing the culture of “too big to fail” Wall Street bailouts.  

  • Kentucky provides 2.3% of energy

    When it comes to supplying the energy that powers our country, Kentucky plays a bigger role than most.  We represent just 1.4 percent of its population, but provide 2.3 percent of its electricity.

    The main reason for that, of course, is coal, which was first commercially mined in the Commonwealth in 1820.  Now, only two states extract more annually, and only four depend on it more to run their homes, schools and businesses. Here in Kentucky, it supplies more than 90 percent of our electricity.