.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's Opinions

  • 2010 election moment has started in Henry County

    Thanks to the Henry County Local for reporting on a very important issue pertaining to our county politics in last week’s paper. As reported, it appears the momentum of the 2010 election has started and many Henry County residents and Kentucky state representatives have taken an interest in the future of Henry County and it’s political status.   Last meeting, Secretary of State, Trey Grayson provided information and direction at the last Henry County Republican monthly meeting.

  • Survey questions are being addressed

    The first priority of elected officials at any level of government is making sure that they truly listen to those they serve.

    With that in mind, I sent out a 17-question survey before the start of the 2009 Regular Session to gauge the views of several hundred households located in our legislative district.  The results, as I expected, were enlightening.

  • The cupboard isn’t just bare, it’s gone

    When Governor Beshear took office in December 2007, he joked that he knew the cupboard would be bare, but that he didn’t expect it to be gone.

    Since then, he has overseen more than $430 million worth of cuts, all without touching Medicaid and our classrooms.  Unfortunately, with the nation’s economy showing no signs of improvement, he and the General Assembly learned in November that this would not be enough.  Our state economists told us that another $456 million would still need to be trimmed by the end of June.

  • Superintendent thanks Foundation supporters

    On behalf of the Eminence Education Foundation and the Eminence Independent School District, I would like to take this opportunity to express my gratitude for making our Education Dinner and Silent Auction such a success.  The Foundation collected approximately $9,000 to use for future scholarships and teachers’ grants.

  • Students delight in poetry competition

    When Eminence High School English teacher, Cara Puckett, offered me the opportunity to be a guest judge for her students’ Poetry Out Loud competition, I eagerly accepted.

    I like poetry, I like teenagers, how hard could it be?

    Then I checked out the Poetry Out Loud National Recitation Project website and started to appreciate the complexities.

    Participants were to choose two poems from a list of thousands spanning hundreds of years and representing all the different types of poetry.

  • Thanks to all who helped during ‘natural disaster’

    Our Governor is calling it the most widespread natural disaster in our state’s history.  This was my second widespread natural disaster since taking office.   In the case of the tornadoes of 2004 and this recent ice storm, I have been extremely proud of the caring and resourceful people of this county.  At this time I would like to thank a few of those who pitched in to make the best out of the recent event.

  • Many helped in making roads safe, getting students home

    On Feb. 3, the snow caused considerable headaches for many motorists. The timing of the snow and more of it than was forecast caused many parents to have concerns about the safety of their children while traveling home from school. I, like every employee of the Henry County Public Schools, make the safety of our children my number one priority each and every day. It gives me great comfort to know that the transportation staff performs their duties with a great amount of professionalism.

  • I’m not the pioneer I thought I was

    The recent power outage made me realize that perhaps my self-image has always been slightly askew. All my life, I have fancied myself the “pioneer” type; delighting in the sight of my baby’s freshly washed diapers flapping in the Kansas breeze, making jam out of the wild blackberries I picked myself on our farm, knitting cotton dishrags for the kitchen, and helping haul water when we still depended on a cistern.  I have always felt the simple life was for me, as if I could step into the pages of a Laura Ingalls Wilder book and feel completely at home.