.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's Opinions

  • Thieves will have to answer for their deeds

    This letter is for all the people that have had flowers, vases and wreaths stolen from a loved one’s gravesite. It’s as if we haven’t had enough grief after losing someone that they add to the agony by taking these items. You will have to answer for these deeds on judgment day and hopefully you will think before you do this again!

    Bruce and Lillian Owens
    New Castle

  • Stop taking our flowers!

    To whoever is stealing flowers from the New Castle Cemetery: Many people like to keep flowers on the grave of family members. It is bad when you have to replace them two or three times a year because someone steals them. I know the wind blows them off sometimes, but other times people take them. I am sure everyone who has had flowers missing would appreciate it if you would stop.

    Tommy Singleton
    Campbellsburg

  • A legacy of helping senior citizens

    One of the country’s biggest challenges over the next few decades is ensuring that the “golden years” truly live up to their name for our older citizens.

    As more Baby Boomers begin turning 65 – the first began celebrating that milestone birthday in January – this group of citizens promises to be a fastest-growing demographic for quite some time.

  • Family of Relay For Life Chairwoman Marla Young
  • Needed reform: The REINS Act

    Some utility companies in Kentucky announced in May that they would need to raise electricity rates by about 20 percent  over the next five years in order to pay for the upgrades necessary to meet stricter federal environmental regulations.

    These new rules and the resulting increase in utility rates will make it more difficult for families to pay their bills, and will leave job creating businesses with less money to grow and hire new employees.

  • Pastors, Churches, Clubs, Organizations & Community: FRYSC needs HELP!

  • Thanks for support of Relay for Life

  • Broadband becoming a common utility

    For a growing number of Kentuckians, broadband internet is given no more thought than any other utility. Like television and electricity, it’s just expected to be there.

    In fact, it can now be found in about 40 percent of the state’s homes. While that is positive, it’s becoming increasingly clear that we need to see that number grow. According to a Federal Communications Commission report, most states have moved ahead of us when it comes to providing access to this fast-speed connection.