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Features

  • From the Kentucky Health News Network

    From the food we eat to the products we use, there are a lot of misconceptions about what may increase the risk of developing breast cancer. There are known factors, like genetics, that are well documented. But what about lifestyle issues like having a nightly cocktail or using deodorant?

  • 200 Years Ago

    On Oct. 3, 1812, Jesse Moreland delivered the head of one wolf above the age of six months to Deputy Sheriff W. Webb for payment of bounty.  Amount of bounty not noted.

    Levi Scott posted a marriage bond for 50 pounds on Sept. 29, 1812, and secured a license to marry Letticia Shelton, daughter of George Shelton.  They were married on Oct. 1, 1812, by Thomas Vandever, Minister of the Gospel.

    175 Years Ago

    Henry Sudduth was allowed $6 by the county court for constructing a coffin for William Argo, an indigent person.

  • Gayle and Jane Mann will celebrate their 50th wedding anniversary on August 25. They were united in marriage on August 25, 1962 in Milltown, Indiana.

    The couple moved to Henry County in 1966 when i-71 was being built. Gayle was a construction worker. He retired from the Henry County Road Department.  He also served 30+ years  on New Castle Fire Department and as an EMT on volunteer ambulance service. He operated the Welding Shop with partner Roger Golden before going to work for the county.

  • Second Wind Dreams Project-Sewing for Seniors:  Edith Tennill, a member of the Second Wind Dreams Committee organized a sewing workday at the New Castle United Methodist Church this past Saturday to make a special fabric bib for residents at Homestead Nursing Center.  There were volunteers from the Smithfield Christian Church, the New Castle Baptist Church, the Simpsonville United Methodist Church, the Pleasureville United Methodist Church and of course the New Castle United Methodist Church working on the project from 10:00 until 2:00 and they completed about 60 bibs.

  •    
    By Sandy Powell

    Henry County     Public Schools
    When school begins in August, students at Henry County High School who dream of a career in the medical field will have a golden opportunity to enroll in the Health Science Program--a stepping stone to many careers in the health care industry.

  • Submitted by
    Bruce Owens
    Director Henry County Emergency Management Agency
    Heat kills by pushing the human body beyond its limits. In extreme heat and high humidity, evaporation is slowed and the body must work extra hard to maintain a normal temperature.
    Most heat disorders occur because the victim has been overexposed to heat or has over-exercised for his or her age and physical condition. Older adults, young children and those who are sick or overweight are more likely to succumb to extreme heat.

  •  

    When Mona Huff began her weight-loss journey, she started with adjusting her diet.

    But diet only got her so far. She realized she had to do more.

    “I realized how important walking was to my own personal health,” she said. “As I started losing weight, I got to a certain level, and got my blood sugar to a certain level, but it wouldn’t get any better.”

    So she started researching what she could do to get her blood sugar to more healthy levels.

  • Mr. and Mrs. Randy S. Tingle of Campbellsburg celebrated 50 years of marriage on June 15, 2012. Randy and Sherian were married at Sulphur Baptist Church in 1962. They have three children: Tina (David) Smith, Tracy (Hershel) Pennington and Troy (Danyel) Tingle. They also have eight grandchildren.

  • 200 Years Ago

    James B. Richards was released by the court from his indenture to James Hobbs.   Richards was to learn the hatter’s trade while apprenticed to Hobbs.

    On June 1, 1812, Thomas Moore posted a bond of 50 pounds in order to secure a marriage license to wed Lucy Underwood, daughter of James Underwood.  The marriage was officiated by Henry Brinton, Minister of the Gospel, on June 4, 1812.

  • William H. Mason Jr., of Eminence celebrated his 95th birthday on Saturday, May 19, 2012. He celebrated with his family.

    Mr. Mason has delivered meals to senior citizens for over 50 years.

  • Kaylee Tingle, 11, competed in the KYQHA show in Casey County, winning multiple 1st and 2nd place awards. She was the top points winner in the Small Fry division, and was crowned the KYQHA Princess for 2012. She is the daughter of Michael and Kristi Tingle of New Castle; and the granddaughter of Evelyn and the late Tommy Stivers, James Tingle, and Keith and Linda Baker.

  • Glenn Earl and Lois Jean (Chilton) Dowden will celebrate their 60th anniversary on May 28, 2012. They were married by Bro. Fitzpatrick at Campbellsburg Baptist Church after a courtship as high school sweethearts. Glenn retired as a farmer raising cattle, hay and tobacco. Lois raised their children and was a homemaker. She later attended school and became a CNA for Old Mason’s Home in Shelbyville.

  • Mr. and Mrs. William Henry Mason Jr. of Eminence will celebrate their 72 wedding anniversary on Sunday April 8, 2012. They were married on April 8, 1939.

    The Masons have four children, Mrs. Dorothy J. Fero and husband, John of Rochester, Mich., Mrs. Shirley J. Smith of Carrollton, Marian McNeal Mason and wife Deborah of Jamaica, New York and the late William H. Mason III.

    They have six grandchildren and five great-grandchildren.

  • Tony S. Colbert, formerly of Port Royal, and Janelyn L. Jimenez of Iloilo Cinty, Philippines were united in marriage on Oct. 27, 2011, at Naval Air Station Chapel, Pensacola, Fla.

    Tony is employed as a correctional officer at Roederer Correctional Complex in La Grange. He served in the U.S. Navy from 1980 to 2000.

    The couple resides in Carrollton.

  • They say timing is everything, and so it was for Eminence High School senior Alyssa Jones.

    Jones, who has been involved in her church choir since she was very young and began taking voice lessons from Ruth Ann Mills-Moore in New Castle as a fourth-grader, participated in the music program during her three years at Henry County High School.

    Last summer, she and her family moved to the house in Eminence where her late grandmother lived. That meant transferring from HCHS to EHS for her senior year.

  • An Eminence-based alumni group hopes to honor a man who devoted most of his adult life to youth baseball.

    Members of the Merriweather-King Street School Fund are hoping to convince Eminence Independent Schools officials to name a high school ballfield after long-time youth league coach Leeroy Winburn.

    Winburn, who also served on Eminence City Council for 20 years, died in March 2007 at age 63, and some feel recognition for his contributions to the community is overdue.

  • Pulmonary fibrosis.

    The diagnosis three years ago was tantamount to a death sentence for Bonnie Kidwell of Eminence.
    For some time, Kidwell, now 57, had had problems breathing. When the situation worsened, she was treated for pneumonia. When that treatment failed to work, she was hospitalized. The doctors still believed she was fighting pneumonia, but after a week with no improvement, the tests began.