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Opinion

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    Harvest Showcase not about politics

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    Most firsts in life are unforgettable.

    Your first pet. First kiss. First car. First job.

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    First, allow me to congratulate the committee who organized this year’s Harvest Showcase for another job well done.  

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    In just the last few weeks, I’ve decided the only real advantage that GPS on a mobile device can accurately claim over a map is you don’t have to fold electronics after getting finished with them.

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    When I came to Henry County, I couldn’t have been more excited. I had my first real job in my career and was moving to Louisville with my wife. 

  • I wouldn’t call myself a country music fan. I wouldn’t really say I’m a huge music fan in general. Growing up, my parents would more often than not just drive in silence or have conversation, rather than listen to the radio or CDs.

    My grandfather, though, listened to music constantly in the car. When he would pick me up from school, which he did, more than anyone else, we would listen to country music all the way home.

  • In my career as a reporter/editor, I tend to learn things organically, by visiting with people in the community and hearing their points of view.

    After all, no person can know everything. Going to the sources, to the experts, and getting to benefit from the knowledge they’ve accumulated over the years can open a person’s eyes in short order.

  • Have you seen those bumper stickers that say, “I farm. You eat.”?

    I started seeing them several years ago and thought it sounded like farmers were being a bit egotistical or self-important. But that was before I tried my hand at it.

    Before I stopped working full-time about six years ago, I was an avid and loyal customer of the Henry County Farmers Market. Working as many hours as I did prohibited me from having my own garden, but I desperately wanted fresh local produce in the summer, especially garden-grown tomatoes.

  • Are you one of those people whose ears burn when others mention you in conversation? Does that same weird sensation extend to the times when you hear somebody talking about your locality?

    In my case, somebody mentioning my birthplace of Evansville, Ind., can still perk up my ears, even after 20 years of being gone. 

  • Have you ever been stuck in traffic? I don’t mean that you were forced to go 55 in a 65. I’m talking about being really stuck. I mean, the car is parked, locked and you’re out on the side of the interstate cursing your luck and calling your boss to beg his understanding.

  • Mark Fassio

    Guest Columnist

    A few weeks ago the Local published a piece I wrote about the Russian power-grab of Crimea and its fomenting of unrest in Ukraine. With all the attention now ongoing in Iraq and Syria, I thought I’d try to explain what’s going on, and why. (My first region of study in the military was the MidEast, and I deployed there twice my career. This is déjà vu all over again.)

  • McConnell at center of dysfunction

    It isn’t a surprise that Jon Park would take to the pages of this paper to distort and mislead residents of Henry County on Alison Lundergan Grimes’ candidacy for U.S. Senate. After all, Park’s candidate – Senator Mitch McConnell – has no record to run on at all.

    But let’s take a look at the unsubstantiated arguments made and the very important issues conveniently ignored.

  • By Jon Park

     

    A few weeks ago, a commercial began running with a mother thanking Alison Lundergan Grimes for a bill she pushed through the state house to help our military personnel vote.

    Sounds good right?

    Problem is, the bill Alison is touting as a crowning achievement of her work as Secretary of State, the Military Heroes Voting Initiative, is not what she had originally sought.  

    State Senator Damon Thayer, the Majority Floor Leader recently said, “We had to do major surgery to that bill.”  

  • Ask any charitable organization and they’ll tell you the most precious commodity to come by these days is time. Folks are much more likely to write a check or put together a bag of clothes to donate than allot any of their time to a particular cause.

    But the men and women of our county’s volunteer fire departments are different.

  • I hope that our sports editor, Greg Woods, will forgive me. I’m about to step into his turf.

  • It’s my opinion that the world is rarely black and white. Usually issues, especially ones that are social in nature, fall somewhere in the gray middle. And that’s a scary place. Most of us don’t like to operate in shades of gray because black and white is so much easier.

  • So here’s something I’ll never understand on any level — why would anybody want to surrender themselves to the lure of a dangerous drug like heroin?

    I felt astounded by the news that Northern Kentucky — a place I’m familiar with due to having family and friends across the Ohio in Cincinnati and having lived there myself — leads the nation in heroin abuse.

    It’s a safe bet that I’m as sheltered a person as you’ll ever meet.

  • Last month the Secretary of State’s office announced that the Republican Party has grown by 4 percent in the Commonwealth of Kentucky. Still the minority party in the state, the GOP is growing in voter registrations, and on a steady climb upward.

    This past Saturday evening at the 2014 Lincoln-Reagan Dinner, I was pleased to announce that Henry County is no exception to the increase.  

    In fact, in the past four years, Republican Party voter registration has risen over 10 percent.  

  • Graduating is weird. Seriously, it’s one of the most bizarre ceremonies we, as human beings take part in. We wear some ugly robes and hats, trudge across a stage, take a piece of rolled-up paper from some other robe-wearing goons and-voila!-you’re an adult.

  • Ricky Doyle

    GOP Candidate, County Judge Executive

    Scenic roads, beautiful landscapes, grazing cattle, friendly and hard-working people are just some of the reasons why I like living in Henry County.  Often we take for granted the many assets that this county has to offer, but if we want to bring more business into our county, we need to promote our county. All of us should have community investment in the future of our county’s growth.