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Opinion

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    One hope I held for my time in the wide-open spaces of Henry County involved the possibility of hearing a familiar cry.

    It pleased and surprised me to no end to catch the whistled call of “Bob White! Bob White!” during a return visit to Olney, Ill., while showing my wife around where I used to live in the Prairie State.

  •  In just about a month, voters in Kentucky will take center stage in America. 

    The entire country is watching the McConnell-Grimes senatorial race, and I hope we don’t embarrass ourselves. 

    Sadly, voter turnout is notoriously low in parts of Kentucky, Henry County being no exception. If one-third of all registered voters actually make it to the polls, it is considered a strong turnout. I think we can do better than that.

  •  In support of new community theatre

    Last Friday night my wife and I had the privilege of attending the inaugural performance of The Theatre Downstream. This is Henry County’s community theater, which uses the Henry County High School for performances.

    The play, “Moon Over Buffalo,” was fast-paced, full of humor and action and was wonderfully executed by a truly professional acting troupe.

  •  Recognizing true leadership

    As life continues to unfold and I find myself moving to new locations and taking on different challenges, I always take time to look back and evaluate where I came from and the impact those experiences have on who I am becoming. 

  •  The closest tie to Louisville I used to have in my youth came in the form of the long concrete path of Interstate 64, which hastened my journey to see family in Cincinnati through its connection to I-71.

    As a child and passenger, the trip through Kentucky didn’t mean that much to me — just a means to an end and a sightseeing tour chauffeured by my dad.

  •  The closest tie to Louisville I used to have in my youth came in the form of the long concrete path of Interstate 64, which hastened my journey to see family in Cincinnati through its connection to I-71.

    As a child and passenger, the trip through Kentucky didn’t mean that much to me — just a means to an end and a sightseeing tour chauffeured by my dad.

  •  The older I get the more precious I find life and my relationships with others to be. Our time could be over at any given moment, without warning, and each day is a reminder to prepare for that unfortunate truth. 

    When I was in elementary school, my family moved from Whittemore Prescott to Gaylord, Michigan. We were building a home in a newly developed subdivision where there was only one finished house, and another being built across the cul-de-sac from us. 

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    Harvest Showcase not about politics

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    Most firsts in life are unforgettable.

    Your first pet. First kiss. First car. First job.

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    First, allow me to congratulate the committee who organized this year’s Harvest Showcase for another job well done.  

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    In just the last few weeks, I’ve decided the only real advantage that GPS on a mobile device can accurately claim over a map is you don’t have to fold electronics after getting finished with them.

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    When I came to Henry County, I couldn’t have been more excited. I had my first real job in my career and was moving to Louisville with my wife. 

  • I wouldn’t call myself a country music fan. I wouldn’t really say I’m a huge music fan in general. Growing up, my parents would more often than not just drive in silence or have conversation, rather than listen to the radio or CDs.

    My grandfather, though, listened to music constantly in the car. When he would pick me up from school, which he did, more than anyone else, we would listen to country music all the way home.

  • In my career as a reporter/editor, I tend to learn things organically, by visiting with people in the community and hearing their points of view.

    After all, no person can know everything. Going to the sources, to the experts, and getting to benefit from the knowledge they’ve accumulated over the years can open a person’s eyes in short order.

  • Have you seen those bumper stickers that say, “I farm. You eat.”?

    I started seeing them several years ago and thought it sounded like farmers were being a bit egotistical or self-important. But that was before I tried my hand at it.

    Before I stopped working full-time about six years ago, I was an avid and loyal customer of the Henry County Farmers Market. Working as many hours as I did prohibited me from having my own garden, but I desperately wanted fresh local produce in the summer, especially garden-grown tomatoes.

  • Are you one of those people whose ears burn when others mention you in conversation? Does that same weird sensation extend to the times when you hear somebody talking about your locality?

    In my case, somebody mentioning my birthplace of Evansville, Ind., can still perk up my ears, even after 20 years of being gone. 

  • Have you ever been stuck in traffic? I don’t mean that you were forced to go 55 in a 65. I’m talking about being really stuck. I mean, the car is parked, locked and you’re out on the side of the interstate cursing your luck and calling your boss to beg his understanding.

  • Mark Fassio

    Guest Columnist

    A few weeks ago the Local published a piece I wrote about the Russian power-grab of Crimea and its fomenting of unrest in Ukraine. With all the attention now ongoing in Iraq and Syria, I thought I’d try to explain what’s going on, and why. (My first region of study in the military was the MidEast, and I deployed there twice my career. This is déjà vu all over again.)

  • McConnell at center of dysfunction

    It isn’t a surprise that Jon Park would take to the pages of this paper to distort and mislead residents of Henry County on Alison Lundergan Grimes’ candidacy for U.S. Senate. After all, Park’s candidate – Senator Mitch McConnell – has no record to run on at all.

    But let’s take a look at the unsubstantiated arguments made and the very important issues conveniently ignored.

  • By Jon Park

     

    A few weeks ago, a commercial began running with a mother thanking Alison Lundergan Grimes for a bill she pushed through the state house to help our military personnel vote.

    Sounds good right?

    Problem is, the bill Alison is touting as a crowning achievement of her work as Secretary of State, the Military Heroes Voting Initiative, is not what she had originally sought.  

    State Senator Damon Thayer, the Majority Floor Leader recently said, “We had to do major surgery to that bill.”