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Opinion

  • All invited to pray for addiction recovery efforts
    In the face of tremendous pain and suffering caused by drug use, the pastors of Henry County have come together, forming an initiative to consider a response filled with both grace and truth.
    Our desire is to affirm all life as sacred, that no one is too far gone, that no soul is beyond saving. We know this because we are not perfect ourselves. Ministers stand in the need of the same grace.

  • On some anniversaries we celebrate. On others we reflect.
    The 15th anniversary of the attack on America and New York’s World Trade Center is one of the times for reflection. There is truly nothing to celebrate in the extraordinary tragedy of 9/11.
    As much as I would like to forget some of them, the images from that day will never be out of my mind, nor will the victims and their families.
    But there is one memory I want to hold on to, one that I want to cherish as the deepest and most lasting of Sept. 11, 2001.

  • I have, at times, been accused of being a Pollyanna. It’s not an overly offensive name to be called, especially in light of the fact I’ve been called much worse.

    As a noun, Pollyanna means “an excessively or blindly optimistic person.” As an adjective, the descriptor takes a bit of a turn, being “unreasonably or illogically optimistic.”

  • Some of Kentucky’s most successful academic programs take place, oddly enough, when the school year is over.

    Several of these got their start in the 1980s, and they have since given thousands of our brightest middle and high school students a chance to come together in a college setting and learn in ways that often extend beyond the traditional classroom.

    The Governor’s Scholars Program (GSP) is perhaps the most well-known of these. It began in 1983 and now serves more than 1,100 students each summer over several campuses across the commonwealth.

  • When I attended college at the University of Cincinnati following the path of least resistance to earn my English degree with a minor in journalism, my fourth-floor walkup studio apartment stood just across from the campus in the crowded neighborhood at the corner of Clifton and McMillan streets. It featured a healthy business district that catered to students and fraternity members.

  • By Jesse Harp, Intern

    “There’s nothing wrong with women having children, taking care of their homes and being domestic. That’s what they were created for, after all.”

    Something shattered inside of me when I heard these words come from a girl in one of my classes my first year of college. Suddenly every nuance of sexism I’ve experienced in my life was tossed onto the shore of my conscience by a new wave of passion.

  • As it has for nearly two-and-a-half centuries, our nation will pause on Monday to celebrate its “birthday,” commemorating a time 240 years ago when the Founding Fathers declared our independence.

    Since July 4, 1776, we have weathered a war for our freedom, a war against ourselves, and wars against those who would like nothing more than to see us and our values falter. Although the world has changed in countless ways since Thomas Jefferson penned the Declaration of Independence, our commitment to protect and promote freedom has never wavered.

  • This is one of those race-to-the-bottom columns.

    I’ve tried in vain to access my superego countless times during the week with the intention of writing about some uplifting topic.

    A very divided United Kingdom voting to destroy continental unity and scuttle their long relationship with the European Union — what largely seems a system to oversee commerce and to bolster the economy there — makes it seem naive to talk about the evidence I see of an improving economy at home.

  • Despite the doom and gloom predictions that print is dead, community newspapers like the Henry County Local are flourishing.
    But why?
    First and foremost, we are the only consistent local media presence in the county. While there are others who pop in and out when “big” news hits, we’re here with our readers week in and week out to bring you a variety of coverage, including the “big” story, and so much more.

  • The General Assembly may be at its busiest during the first several months of the year, when the House and Senate are focused on passing new laws, but the summer and fall months are important as well to the legislative process.

  • We were at a friend’s house over the weekend for a cookout. It was a beautiful day, although cloudy, but humidity was low and sitting outside was rather comfortable with a strong breeze carrying across the back patio.

    Despite the mild weather, the 3-year-old daughter of other friends who also came to the cookout immediately wanted to get in the above-ground pool just as soon as they arrived. She was warned that it was still early in the season and that it wasn’t a very warm day so the water would be pretty cold.

  • Since House and Senate leaders announced Thursday morning that budget talks had stalled, there have understandably been many questions from the public about what happened – and what is likely to happen next.
    If the conflict could be boiled down to a single word, it would be “education.”  
    The House believes that, in an era where there is money to meet our core needs and fully fund contributions to our two main public retirement systems, schools and universities should not be cut.

  • There have been several times in my life when I remember where I was or what I was doing when something monumental happened.
    Perhaps the event in history that has been most impactful and unforgettable in my lifetime was 9/11.
    On Monday, Sept. 10, 2001, I flew to Norfolk, Va., for a weeklong corporate leadership training for new managers.

  • Notice:

    The Henry County Local will be closed on Monday, Jan. 18, in honor of Martin Luther King Jr. Day. Early advertising and editorial deadlines of Friday, Jan. 15, by noon will apply for the Jan. 20 issue.

  • By U.S. Rep. Thomas Massie

  • Life coaches sometimes indicate that New Year’s resolutions are a bit toxic, because they typically set the resolvers up for quick failure. And, so, they should be avoided.
    I made a resolution over the holidays, but it isn’t all that difficult or complicated.

  • Henry County made national news last week after a Henry County High School student’s Facebook post about seeing another student refused lunch went viral, caught wind and sailed across local airwaves, across the country and even across the pond hitting the news in London.

    The student’s post expressed frustration with the school district for not allowing the other student to have a meal because her lunch account was overdue. 

  • In Aesop’s fable of the ant and the grasshopper, the ant works through the summer to create a store of food for the winter while the grasshopper laughs at him and spends his summer days playing. When winter comes, the ant has enough food to last through the cold months while the grasshopper dies of starvation. It is a cautionary tale of the importance of preparing for hard times even in times of plenty.