.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Opinion

  • Today I would like to talk about the state Tire Amnesty Program put on by the Kentucky Department of Waste Management.

    The program began in the county in 1999 and continued every four years. The program is set up to accept and dispose of most tires, in an effort to eliminate unwanted tires from our streams, roadsides and other locations at no charge to the public. The program will be offered to Henry County residents Oct. 20-22 at the state road barn located on Kentucky-193, north of New Castle.

  • I confess to being a Facebook fan.  While I don’t spend a lot time on Facebook, I do find it an interesting place to visit.  Recently, a friend posted the following: “If you didn’t hear it with your own ears or see it with your own eyes, don’t invent it with your small mind and share it with your big mouth.”

  • As chairman of the Subcommittee on Human Resources, it is my responsibility to periodically review programs under my jurisdiction to ensure they are an effective use of taxpayer dollars.

    Representative Lloyd Doggett (D-Texas) and I worked together to accomplish that result with legislation that was signed into law last week by President Obama.  The Child and Family Services Improvement and Innovation Act (H.R. 2883) reauthorizes and improves two important child welfare programs to continue serving children and families in need without adding to the deficit.  

  • While no one can accurately predict where a traffic accident might take place, information gathered by the Kentucky State Police gives us a pretty good idea of when the odds are certainly more in our favor.

    Based on its latest annual report, which was released last week, one of the safest places to be on the highway in 2010 was in a vehicle driven at dawn on a Sunday in March by a woman in her late 60s or early 70s who was making her way between Owensboro and Henderson on the Audubon Parkway.

  • Last week, President Obama visited the greater Northern Kentucky area to rally support for his bill, the American Jobs Act.  The President claims his bill will get Americans back to work in part by funding critical infrastructure needs.

  • While traveling the Fourth Congressional District during August, it was clear to me that the top priorities of Kentuckians are jobs and economic growth.  The need for these issues to be our top priority is reinforced by the latest jobs report that zero net jobs were created in America last month, and the unemployment rate remains unacceptably high at more than 9 percent.

    As lawmakers returned to Washington last week, President Obama addressed a special joint session of Congress to outline his plan to get the economy moving again and create jobs.

  • The members of the Henry County Farmers Market would like to thank all those involved in the success of our recent Customer Appreciation Day. Big thanks to: Smokin’ Aces BBQ (visit them on Saturdays in front of the former laundromat in New Castle) for grilling and serving up some fantastic hot dogs; Sarah Sutherland for providing our karaoke entertainment; and James Sanders, balloon artist extraordinaire, for delighting the children with wonderful balloon creations.

  • “Buy land,” Mark Twain once said.  “They’re not making any more of it.”

    That investment advice has been taken to heart by the Kentucky State Nature Preserves Commission, which formally celebrated 35 years of service last week.

    Since it began, the commission has permanently set aside more than 25,000 irreplaceable acres for future generations.  Their 60 nature preserves range from the Blanton Forest near Virginia to Three Ponds along the Mississippi River.

  • There are only a handful of days in which a whole country collectively remembers what it was doing.  Some have been high points in our history, like V-E and V-J Day at the end of World War II and Neil Armstrong’s first steps on the moon.  And some have been moments we wish had never occurred, like Pearl Harbor, President Kennedy’s assassination, and the tragedies of Sept. 11, 2001.

    For those old enough to remember that last date, it seems hard to believe that 10 years have slipped by since that cool and clear morning.

  • My name is Billy Sanders and I am the appointed Henry County Jailer.

    A few weeks ago, both the Republican and Democratic Parties announced their nominations for the Nov. 8 election. I would like to take this opportunity to introduce myself and declare my intention to run as an independent, write-in candidate. To the citizens of Henry County, I say this: I love my job and I am the best qualified candidate.

  • On April 20, 1999, the staff of the Evansville Press was plugging away at that day’s edition. We were minutes away from sending the pages to the press when we got word: About a dozen students were dead, and many more injured, at a high school in Colorado.

    Page production stopped as we gathered around the news editor’s television to get a glimpse of the initial reports. The Associated Press had a story in short order, and we were able to get word of the Columbine High School tragedy in that afternoon’s edition.

  • Traveling through Kentucky’s Fourth District during the August district work period, I have had the chance to speak with a number of small business owners, local bankers, health care providers and farmers who are very concerned about the impact of new regulations on their businesses.  They want to know: what is being done to deal with the unaccountable onslaught of these job-crushing rules?

  • We want to thank the many individuals, organizations, and churches that have made donations of clothes, food, hygiene, school supplies, etc. in the past few months!  We appreciate the churches and individuals so much for all of the time that they volunteered during the Hearts of Grace Clothes Give Away!  Without the many hearts and hands of the community, this event would not have taken place!  You served over 500 people (adults and children) with clothes!

  • While the classroom experience for Kentucky students invariably changes from decade to decade, there is still one constant that binds one generation to the next: A field trip to the state capital.

    Thousands of children make the trek each year, seeing such common sites as the larger-than-life statue of President Lincoln in the Capitol Rotunda and, just a few miles away, the Old State Capitol’s self-supporting staircase, which for more than 180 years has been anchored by a well-placed keystone.

  • Winston Churchill once famously remarked that we make a living by what we get, but we make a life by what we give.

    That sense of charity has defined our country from the beginning, and even when times are tough, we don’t hesitate to reach out and help.

  • Summer is nearing an end and children all across Kentucky have or soon will be headed back to school. While many students may groan at the thought of homework, tests, book reports and science projects, most are also excited to see old friends and to get a fresh start on a new year.

  • August is a special time of year, full of new beginnings.  Whether it is the first day of kindergarten, middle school, high school or college, each new school year brings excitement and new challenges for families, students, teachers and administrators.  Pat and I have two kids in college, three starting a new school year, and our eldest daughter is a teacher.  Our family is getting ready for an exciting new school year. 

  • I read with interest “Families petition for bus service,” that appeared on page one, Aug. 10, 2011, in the Henry County Local. It brought back recollections that my dad and mother worked through to get a school bus for the Smithfield grade school students.