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Opinion

  • There are only a handful of days in which a whole country collectively remembers what it was doing.  Some have been high points in our history, like V-E and V-J Day at the end of World War II and Neil Armstrong’s first steps on the moon.  And some have been moments we wish had never occurred, like Pearl Harbor, President Kennedy’s assassination, and the tragedies of Sept. 11, 2001.

    For those old enough to remember that last date, it seems hard to believe that 10 years have slipped by since that cool and clear morning.

  • My name is Billy Sanders and I am the appointed Henry County Jailer.

    A few weeks ago, both the Republican and Democratic Parties announced their nominations for the Nov. 8 election. I would like to take this opportunity to introduce myself and declare my intention to run as an independent, write-in candidate. To the citizens of Henry County, I say this: I love my job and I am the best qualified candidate.

  • On April 20, 1999, the staff of the Evansville Press was plugging away at that day’s edition. We were minutes away from sending the pages to the press when we got word: About a dozen students were dead, and many more injured, at a high school in Colorado.

    Page production stopped as we gathered around the news editor’s television to get a glimpse of the initial reports. The Associated Press had a story in short order, and we were able to get word of the Columbine High School tragedy in that afternoon’s edition.

  • Traveling through Kentucky’s Fourth District during the August district work period, I have had the chance to speak with a number of small business owners, local bankers, health care providers and farmers who are very concerned about the impact of new regulations on their businesses.  They want to know: what is being done to deal with the unaccountable onslaught of these job-crushing rules?

  • We want to thank the many individuals, organizations, and churches that have made donations of clothes, food, hygiene, school supplies, etc. in the past few months!  We appreciate the churches and individuals so much for all of the time that they volunteered during the Hearts of Grace Clothes Give Away!  Without the many hearts and hands of the community, this event would not have taken place!  You served over 500 people (adults and children) with clothes!

  • While the classroom experience for Kentucky students invariably changes from decade to decade, there is still one constant that binds one generation to the next: A field trip to the state capital.

    Thousands of children make the trek each year, seeing such common sites as the larger-than-life statue of President Lincoln in the Capitol Rotunda and, just a few miles away, the Old State Capitol’s self-supporting staircase, which for more than 180 years has been anchored by a well-placed keystone.

  • Winston Churchill once famously remarked that we make a living by what we get, but we make a life by what we give.

    That sense of charity has defined our country from the beginning, and even when times are tough, we don’t hesitate to reach out and help.

  • Summer is nearing an end and children all across Kentucky have or soon will be headed back to school. While many students may groan at the thought of homework, tests, book reports and science projects, most are also excited to see old friends and to get a fresh start on a new year.

  • August is a special time of year, full of new beginnings.  Whether it is the first day of kindergarten, middle school, high school or college, each new school year brings excitement and new challenges for families, students, teachers and administrators.  Pat and I have two kids in college, three starting a new school year, and our eldest daughter is a teacher.  Our family is getting ready for an exciting new school year. 

  • I read with interest “Families petition for bus service,” that appeared on page one, Aug. 10, 2011, in the Henry County Local. It brought back recollections that my dad and mother worked through to get a school bus for the Smithfield grade school students.

  • When it comes to being “green,” Kentucky is taking a leading role in proving that, environmentally speaking, less is really more.

    Our recycling rate, for example, has doubled over the last decade, and in 2008, we passed the national average for the first time. Now, nearly a third of our recyclable materials – such things as aluminum, plastic, glass and paper – are being re-used rather than shipped off to the landfill. Altogether, it amounts to about two million tons annually that are being saved.

  • August is a special time of year, full of new beginnings.  Whether it is the first day of kindergarten, middle school, high school or college, each new school year brings excitement and new challenges for families, students, teachers and administrators.  Pat and I have two kids in college, three starting a new school year, and our eldest daughter is a teacher.  Our family is getting ready for an exciting new school year. 

  • As a former HCYFL coach, I appreciate Tommie Kendall’s HCL article last week to raise local awareness of the sudden drop in numbers of our youth football participation, particularly in the Eastern Elementary School District.
    A big factor that always seems to result in low numbers of kids playing for the Eastern Colts is the fact that the district covers such a wide, rural area. Some may feel it’s too much of a drive to get their kids to practice every day or that the cost involved is too much to pay.    

  • Do you remember the days when cruising was a weekly event?
    Or the days of the Eminence v. Henry County football games?
    Or how about B&D Video or Lola’s Restaurant in Eminence?
    Or, better yet, do you remember the days of Big Henry?
    If so, you’re probably from Henry County.
    It’s the latest Facebook rage — community pages where folks share their favorite memories from the communities they grew up in. The memories are touching, funny, sad and some a smidge risque.

  • Pain was clearly etched on her face, and she gripped her daughter’s hand like a vice while a registered nurse changed a wound dressing.
    Within a few minutes the change was complete, the vacuum pump for the wound turned on and Mary did the strangest thing.

    She thanked the RN despite the obvious pain she had just caused. “Thank you, hon,” she said, squeezing the nurse’s hand.

    Mary is one of two women in my life who I am proud to call mother, though her title has a step- in front of it.

  • Our country is facing a debt crisis.  The federal government currently borrows 40 cents of every dollar it spends.  This year the government will spend $1.5 trillion more than it takes in, adding to a national debt that is already more than $14.3 trillion, two and a half times the size it was just a decade ago in 2001.

  • Summer is here and we’re already seeing the dreaded headlines about children who are left inside hot cars, leading to heat stroke and even death.

    Since 1998, at least 13 children in Kentucky have died as a result of being left inside sweltering vehicles while their parents or caregivers shop, go to work or run errands. It’s just another example of the abuse and neglect that plagues Kentucky’s children.

  • One of the Commonwealth’s most famous authors, Jesse Stuart, once wrote that “if these United States can be called a body, Kentucky can be called its heart.”

    He was referring to more than just our location, of course, but his words have proven prophetic in a geographic sense as well.  It turns out that our literal place in the world is a great place to be when it comes to helping the world get what it needs.