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Opinion

  • Our country is facing a debt crisis.  The federal government currently borrows 40 cents of every dollar it spends.  This year the government will spend $1.5 trillion more than it takes in, adding to a national debt that is already more than $14.3 trillion, two and a half times the size it was just a decade ago in 2001.

  • Summer is here and we’re already seeing the dreaded headlines about children who are left inside hot cars, leading to heat stroke and even death.

    Since 1998, at least 13 children in Kentucky have died as a result of being left inside sweltering vehicles while their parents or caregivers shop, go to work or run errands. It’s just another example of the abuse and neglect that plagues Kentucky’s children.

  • One of the Commonwealth’s most famous authors, Jesse Stuart, once wrote that “if these United States can be called a body, Kentucky can be called its heart.”

    He was referring to more than just our location, of course, but his words have proven prophetic in a geographic sense as well.  It turns out that our literal place in the world is a great place to be when it comes to helping the world get what it needs.

  • The Henry County Public Library would like to thank the fine people of Henry County and the surrounding areas for a truly magical month.

  • A few weeks ago, it would have been safe to say not a single foreign terrorist in the world could find Bowling Green, Kentucky, on a map. But after the ill-advised decision of the Obama Administration to try two foreign fighters in a civilian federal court in Bowling Green, they probably know where it is now.

    Over the past few weeks, a broad bipartisan coalition of concerned local, state, and federal leaders have expressed deep concerns with the prospect of trying these enemy combatants in Kentucky.

  • This letter is for all the people that have had flowers, vases and wreaths stolen from a loved one’s gravesite. It’s as if we haven’t had enough grief after losing someone that they add to the agony by taking these items. You will have to answer for these deeds on judgment day and hopefully you will think before you do this again!

    Bruce and Lillian Owens
    New Castle

  • To whoever is stealing flowers from the New Castle Cemetery: Many people like to keep flowers on the grave of family members. It is bad when you have to replace them two or three times a year because someone steals them. I know the wind blows them off sometimes, but other times people take them. I am sure everyone who has had flowers missing would appreciate it if you would stop.

    Tommy Singleton
    Campbellsburg

  • One of the country’s biggest challenges over the next few decades is ensuring that the “golden years” truly live up to their name for our older citizens.

    As more Baby Boomers begin turning 65 – the first began celebrating that milestone birthday in January – this group of citizens promises to be a fastest-growing demographic for quite some time.

  • It was a seemingly innocuous comment. “I bought one of those Hot Pots,” a friend said. “I got tired of waiting for the tea kettle to boil water.”

    It was a sign of many things, not the least of which is how my friend and I have changed, or how our ways have parted, in the last 10 years.

    Waiting for a tea kettle to boil is among my favorite things in the morning.

  • Each year parents have the opportunity to be elected as a parent representative for the HCHS School Based Decision Making Council (SBDM).

    The council is composed of the principal, three teachers and two parent representatives.

  • This year marked the 100th anniversary of Boy Scouts in the United States as well as the year that I completed the requirements necessary to achieve the rank of Eagle Scout. I belong to BSA troop 109 which is sponsored by St. Francis in the Field Church in Prospect, but I live in Smithfield and wanted to thank all of my friends in Henry County who really helped make it possible for me to become an Eagle.

  • It’s been awhile since I was able to spend Christmas with both parents and my siblings.

    Since coming to Henry County we’ve been deterred by weather and ill-timed car problems.

    You see, it’s about a four-hour drive to get to my dad’s home in Western Kentucky — there’s no direct route, and the path is easily made treacherous by the slightest amount of snow.

    Mom’s place is only about 2.5 hours away, a much easier trek, mostly by interstate.

  • Many Christmases ago, hard times hit the DiFazio clan. The kids were just in elementary school.

    Dad was finding it increasingly hard to deal with the debilitating effects of Multiple Sclerosis.

    Add to that the failure of both local businesses where he and I had worked for years.

    This perfect storm combined to leave us penniless at “the most wonderful time of the year.”
    I had been a part of charity in action most of my life, on the giving side.

  • The story on NPR Tuesday morning left me shaking my head.

    At the heart of the story was the question of whether or not print, specifically in this case the printed book, is dead, and how that will impact book stores large and small, chain or independent.

    Call me a luddite if you wish, but I refuse to believe that the physical book will ever really die.

    Raised in a household of readers, I grew up surrounded by books. A home is not a home for me until the bookshelves are up and laden with books.