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Opinion

  • One of the country’s biggest challenges over the next few decades is ensuring that the “golden years” truly live up to their name for our older citizens.

    As more Baby Boomers begin turning 65 – the first began celebrating that milestone birthday in January – this group of citizens promises to be a fastest-growing demographic for quite some time.

  • It was a seemingly innocuous comment. “I bought one of those Hot Pots,” a friend said. “I got tired of waiting for the tea kettle to boil water.”

    It was a sign of many things, not the least of which is how my friend and I have changed, or how our ways have parted, in the last 10 years.

    Waiting for a tea kettle to boil is among my favorite things in the morning.

  • Each year parents have the opportunity to be elected as a parent representative for the HCHS School Based Decision Making Council (SBDM).

    The council is composed of the principal, three teachers and two parent representatives.

  • This year marked the 100th anniversary of Boy Scouts in the United States as well as the year that I completed the requirements necessary to achieve the rank of Eagle Scout. I belong to BSA troop 109 which is sponsored by St. Francis in the Field Church in Prospect, but I live in Smithfield and wanted to thank all of my friends in Henry County who really helped make it possible for me to become an Eagle.

  • It’s been awhile since I was able to spend Christmas with both parents and my siblings.

    Since coming to Henry County we’ve been deterred by weather and ill-timed car problems.

    You see, it’s about a four-hour drive to get to my dad’s home in Western Kentucky — there’s no direct route, and the path is easily made treacherous by the slightest amount of snow.

    Mom’s place is only about 2.5 hours away, a much easier trek, mostly by interstate.

  • Many Christmases ago, hard times hit the DiFazio clan. The kids were just in elementary school.

    Dad was finding it increasingly hard to deal with the debilitating effects of Multiple Sclerosis.

    Add to that the failure of both local businesses where he and I had worked for years.

    This perfect storm combined to leave us penniless at “the most wonderful time of the year.”
    I had been a part of charity in action most of my life, on the giving side.

  • The story on NPR Tuesday morning left me shaking my head.

    At the heart of the story was the question of whether or not print, specifically in this case the printed book, is dead, and how that will impact book stores large and small, chain or independent.

    Call me a luddite if you wish, but I refuse to believe that the physical book will ever really die.

    Raised in a household of readers, I grew up surrounded by books. A home is not a home for me until the bookshelves are up and laden with books.

  • In response to Mr. Jon Parks’ letter to the editor in last week’s paper (“Get your own house in order, first,” Dec. 8), I think it is first important to note who Jon Parks is and why he would write such a letter.

  • Nestled in southeast Henry County in the village of Bethlehem is a treasure – the little Bethlehem post office. And yes, I am prejudiced, but perhaps less because I happen to live in Bethlehem than because of the hustle and bustle that I have experienced in big-city post offices, such as New York, Washington, Philadelphia, Baltimore and, most recently, Louisville.

  • After reading the lead story in the Nov. 24 issue of the Henry County Local, regarding the Henry County Fiscal Court meeting, I am reminded of that old idiom about putting your own house in order before you start giving out advice.

    Judge Executive John Logan Brent, and Magistrate Nick Hawkins pushed a motion to require Henry County fire departments to submit annual budgets and submit to annual audits or risk losing their county collected funds.

  • If you visited our Website over the weekend, you may have noticed something different.

    It was a brief, unintentional unveiling of our new platform. As the platform wasn’t supposed to debut until Dec. 4, the old website was put back up almost as soon as we noticed the faux pas.

    There’s no denying that our soon-to-be old website left quite a bit to be desired. In fact, we were more than a little embarrassed by it. It was not the professional product we wanted to deliver to you.

  • Christmas is a time for joy, but for hundreds of Kentucky children who are victims of abuse and neglect, Christmas joy depends on the generosity of people like you.

    Sunrise Children’s Services provides care for over 500 of these children across Kentucky and we need your help in making their Christmas a little brighter this year. Your donation can help provide children and teens with a few simple toys, needed clothes, and other presents that they’ll get to open on Christmas morning.

  • It never fails. As we head into Thanksgiving week, my thoughts turn into what I’m thankful for — I imagine many of us experience that.
    Throughout the year, I think of these things, but often don’t write them down.

  • When we think of state and local governments, it is certainly understandable that much of our focus is on elected offices.  They are the ones, after all, that ultimately decide the direction the Commonwealth takes.

    But that should not underscore the critical importance of literally hundreds of quasi-government boards and agencies that range from the large – like the Kentucky Lottery Corporation – to such smaller ones as water, fire and library districts.  They, too, touch our daily lives, often in ways we may not even realize.