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Opinion

  • It has been another great year for the Hussey Relay team.  We raised $13,000.00 this year and hope to keep increasing every year.  We could not have done it without the help from this community.  What a great community it is!!  I would like to thank the following individuals and businesses.

  • For nearly a quarter-century, the Kentucky State Police has taken an annual in-depth look at crime in the Commonwealth, drawing from a database that brings together reports compiled by state and local law enforcement.

    Each crime worthy of the police’s attention serves as a dot that helps to paint a pretty good picture of the year faced by our 10,000 officers and their civilian support.  Historically, these reports show some definite trends, indicating where we are doing well and where we could do better.

  • Last week, Speaker Pelosi convened an “emergency” session of the House to vote on a bill that managed to combine three major reoccurring and disturbing themes from Washington Democrats’ agenda – spending money we do not have, authorizing another taxpayer-funded bailout and implementing job killing tax increases – into one $26 billion bill.  The Senate amendment to H.R. 1586, the Democrats’ State Bailout Bill, which I opposed, ultimately passed the House by a vote of 247-161.

  • Hooboy has it been hot lately. Sure, July and August are supposed to be scorchers, but we’re approaching 50 days so far this summer that have charted 90-degree days or higher.

    As I said to my husband last week, it’s wicked hot out there. Hades himself surely is looking for some cool air right now.

    No doubt ice cream sales are up right now, as are electric bills as we struggle to stay cool. Box fans, stand fans and oscillating fans probably are working overtime.

  • It takes months to plan Eminence Day! A handful of dedicated people are working to provide a memorable experience for all of those that are looking for some fun. People like Sandi Hayden, Shelley Summerlin, Tomi Scriber, Brian Golden and Glenn Simpson, along with the festival board. As it gets closer for the City of Eminence, the employees kick into high gear, trying to meet all the requests needed along with their daily responsibilities. Let’s not forget how the businesses come together to make sure that the visitors have a good time.

  • Most would consider it out of the ordinary, to say the least, for a woman like me, who was having children 40 years ago, to be pregnant today. But someone, or someone’s database, is convinced that I am expecting.

  • The Henry County Chamber of Commerce is sponsoring its fifth annual car show at the Harry Hill Park on Saturday. 

  • Kentucky’s oldest highway system – our 1,100 miles of navigable rivers – has been getting a closer look in recent months by the General Assembly.

    A year ago, a permanent legislative committee dedicated solely to waterways held its first meeting; and earlier this year, during the legislative session, my colleagues and I voted to create a new water transportation advisory board, to give us and others in state government a ready resource of information from those whose job is tied to that industry.

  • I agreed when  Jonna Priester wrote “ True leadership means doing that which is  right, though it may not be popular.” I believe true leadership was shown at the June 20th Henry County Fiscal Court meeting.

  • During the early stages of a typhoon, the storm begins brewing offshore and out of sight.  It is not until the typhoon reaches the coastal shore that it takes full form and residents are forced to deal with such a disastrous storm, moving at speeds up to 200 miles per hour.  Once the storm hits the shore, it is only a matter of minutes, hours or days before the waves and wind, destroy homes, businesses and livelihoods.

  • True leadership means doing that which is right, though it may not be popular.

    On Tuesday, June 20, members of the Henry County Fiscal Court missed a prime opportunity to display true leadership.

    At issue was whether or not the court would remove Roger Hartlage from the Henry County Planning and Zoning Commission. In April, Hartlage and the other members of SBH Properties received a notice of violation from the state that charged the group with having improper fill material on its property.

     

  • The Henry County Farmer’s Market was founded on the principle of sharing. Producers in the county wanted to share their cropland, their hard work and the fruits of their labor with their friends and neighbors.

  • The community wide “giveaway” outreach event on July 22 and 23rd in New Castle far surpassed the hopes and expectations of its sponsors.

  • I’ve taken some ribbing recently from family members. It started a couple of months ago, when my husband noticed something was different.

    As we got ready to sit down at the table for dinner, he asked “So why are we eating at the table so much now?”

    Over the weekend, my own mother expressed some surprise that we were sitting down at the table to eat a late lunch I’d prepared.

  • For too long, Congress has delegated an unwarranted level of authority to unelected bureaucrats in the Executive Branch for major decisions that affect you and your family.

    Members of Congress vote on legislation, but the devil is always in the details.  The details of the legislation, which will directly impact you, are often left for unelected government employees to determine.  This is an all too common occurrence that lets Congress off the hook for major federal regulations that impact your everyday life. 

  • For thousands of children attending school, the biggest challenge of the day may not be tied to the classroom, but to their health.

    A little more than 18 months ago, the General Assembly’s Program Review and Investigations Committee began taking a closer look at this issue, to see what more the state might do to help those facing a chronic disease or a potentially life-threatening allergy.

  • Over the course of the past two years, Americans have lost homes, businesses and jobs, attributable in large part to a lack of effective regulations on Wall Street and in the housing market that led to a series of costly bailouts by the federal government.  Last week, Members of the House were faced with a decision between defending the American taxpayer or continuing the culture of “too big to fail” Wall Street bailouts.  

  • When it comes to supplying the energy that powers our country, Kentucky plays a bigger role than most.  We represent just 1.4 percent of its population, but provide 2.3 percent of its electricity.

    The main reason for that, of course, is coal, which was first commercially mined in the Commonwealth in 1820.  Now, only two states extract more annually, and only four depend on it more to run their homes, schools and businesses. Here in Kentucky, it supplies more than 90 percent of our electricity.

  • It saddens me greatly to feel compelled to write this letter to the citizens.  Being raised in Henry County all my life, putting 27 years into teaching the children of this county and giving back to the community, I am shocked, but not surprised, at what I have heard.  It has come to my attention that there are rumors going around this county about my good friend, Ricky Doyle Sr.

     

  • Our forests may not be one of the first things to come to mind when considering the drivers behind Kentucky’s economy, but they should be.

    That’s because we ship more than $6 billion worth of wood products each year.  More than 22,000 people work in wood-processing facilities across the state, and their combined payroll in 2004 was about double the sale of tobacco that year.

    Forests cover 47 percent of Kentucky’s total 25.67 million acres, but even that impressive amount is down about half of what it was before we became a state.