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Opinion

  • The FDA’s job is to ensure the safety of the things marketed as food for our bodies, which they have done time and again with poisonous drugs, chemicals and food additives. By restricting sodium in processed foods they are not removing anything from the shelves or the restaurants. They are making sure the giant multinationals that profit from adding cheap additives, fillers and chemicals must make higher quality products. Is higher quality a bad thing? Obviously not.

  • There is a fellow named John Logan Brent that sounds like a broken record, and people I speak to are not buying it. His statement, “I’ll not take the blame for the wording on a piece of paper that was created 20 years ago, long before I ever took office” has gotten old. Will he take the blame for something he was made aware of four years ago or how about five years ago?

  • I’ve covered some weird meetings in the last eight years. As I’ve reported earlier this year, some of those have been down right wacky.

    But Monday night’s meeting of the Campbellsburg City Council was downright odd.

    Discussion about the city’s fire department, its reconstruction and its funding took up more than half of the 150 minute meeting.

  • Buddy Berry is a remarkable young man on so many very important fronts of life.  He is an outstanding scholar, highly effective teacher, capable administrator, winning coach, tireless youth pastor, faithful husband and model father to name only a few of these vital areas. I have had the personal pleasure of following Buddy’s trajectory of excellence since he was a fearless teenager of sixteen. There is a rare quality that precious few seem to exhibit — the favor of God.

  • Stock up on your favorite junk food now, folks, because it looks like the federal government is going to be messing with our food supply a whole lot more if regulators at the FDA have their way.  Plans are underway to mandate restrictions on salt. The government – that fine institution that exists ostensibly to protect our rights and property in this land of the free – is planning soon to dictate how much salt will be legally permissible in prepared foods at grocery stores and restaurants.

  • April 15 marked Tax Day, a painful reminder of just how much money the government takes from our paychecks every year. As Kentuckians filed their taxes, sending their hard-earned dollars to the federal treasury, many question what Congress is doing with their money.

    Over the last two years, Congress has given Americans a series of bailouts, a failed stimulus package and a government takeover of healthcare, costing roughly $1 trillion each.

  • It is election time again. The purpose for my letter is two fold.

  • Last week’s paper reported the Campbellsburg City Council’s disappointment with Mayor Jan Fletcher.  Specifically, the mayor sought out and hired a new attorney to represent the city; fired its current city attorney, but didn’t let the council know he had done so.  The Local accurately reported the council’s concerns, except for one main aspect.  The mayor was asked by City Councilman Rex Morgan if he had considered any Henry County-based attorneys for the position.  The mayor responded that he had tried to contact Attorney Bill Brammell, but an o

  • The Judy Lea Memorial Henry County Children’s Fund would like to thank all who helped make this year’s fund raising dinner such a success. John Rothenburger, Sidney Rothenburger and the Henry County and Eminence Food Service for preparing and serving the food. Eminence Baptist Church youth group for busing tables. The Campbellsburg Show Choir, Henry County Middle School Choir, Eastern Elementary Choir, New Castle third and fourth graders, Henry County Jazz Band, for the entertainment, Dave Gray for auctioneering, Ben Coomes, Donnie Tipton and Harold Bratton for hosting.

  • Earlier this year, Mr. Michael Pollan was nominated for an Oscar on a documentary full of lies. Not every documentary film sticks with the full, straight to the point facts/truth. There isn’t a law that states that. For this movie, Food Inc., is filled with lies about America’s farmers and food suppliers. How can a topic that can be so strongly focused on, be blown so out of proportion based on these lies? What can we as farmers do with this situation?

  • I would like to thank the New Castle mayor and members of the City Commission for joining into a contract with Liberty Communications, allowing them to install high speed internet transmitters on the New Castle water tower. This will be a great service to the rural citizens of Henry County, allowing us to get away from slow, slow dial-up at a reasonable cost.

    If anyone is interested in high speed internet, please call Liberty Communications at 859-393-8995 or 1-866-505-7332.

    Hugh McBurney

    New Castle

     

  • This side of the story is nothing short of a tragedy. But every story has two sides. David Ethington had family in the court room too that also cried. He also has two sons that are still crying and a daughter too young to know what is going on. Our family has been life long friends of Dago and this has forever changed our lives as well. While I don’t agree with the choices that the two of them made on that night, they were just that, their choices. There isn’t a day that goes by that David doesn’t think about the choice he made.

  • As your Judge-Executive, one issue that I have wrestled with is at what point do you publicly respond to mistruths, false accusations, rumors, etc. If you responded to every one of them you would spend all of your time writing letters to the paper and none of your time making sure the business of the county was getting done. Due to the practicality of writing responses it has been my policy to let most of it go, but occasionally you have something that gets blown so out of proportion that you have no choice but to sit down and try to address it the best you can.

  • Courtesy, Common Sense and Safety fly right out the window every school day morning in New Castle.  It’s a “me first” mentality out there, so we need to say extra prayers that we and our children will make it safely to our destinations.  We stop at school to unload our kids, and it doesn’t matter that kids are crossing in the crosswalk and unloading in the cars ahead of us —we’ve got to get past them, we’ve got to get to where we’re going fast! Me first! Zoom!

  • Three-and-a-half months after it began, the 2010 Regular Session is set to reach the end this week as legislators meet for two days to consider any possible vetoes by Governor Beshear while debating a handful of other bills that could still become law.

  • The saying goes something like this ... “to err is human, to forgive divine.”

    I am a human being. And last week, I erred. In fact, I made a pretty fat mistake — in a headline no less.

    I misspelled Makayla James’ last name in a headline on Cindy DiFazio’s story about the 10-year-old and her love of riding horses.

    Then, I missed the misspelling in the lead paragraph of the story.

    First and foremost, Makayla, you have my sincere apologies.

  • There are a lot of reasons to love April – warm weather, Daffodils, bright yellow Forsythia bushes, Red Bud trees, and even Lilacs. But one of my April pleasures is April Fool’s Day, because it gives me an ideal opportunity to mess with my hubby’s mind.

  • When the Kentucky House of Representatives adopted its two-year budget several weeks ago, my colleagues and I had three main priorities: Streamline government; protect education and our most vulnerable citizens; and kick-start our economy.

  • I’m pleased to say that the most exciting thing I witnessed Monday night was the display of hoops excellence that was the Duke-Butler battle for the NCAA championship.

    Thanks to a subdued Pleasureville City Commission meeting, the game truly was the most exciting thing of the night.

    When last I wrote about the Pleasureville meeting, it definitely was not in a favorable light.

  • As many of you have heard or read, issues around the state’s budget have not yet been resolved.  The primary problem is that the Senate and the House Republicans are unwilling to issue $1.2 billion in additional debt and raise an additional $280 million in taxes.  We are simply not in a position to increase our debt load.