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Opinion

  • Courtesy, Common Sense and Safety fly right out the window every school day morning in New Castle.  It’s a “me first” mentality out there, so we need to say extra prayers that we and our children will make it safely to our destinations.  We stop at school to unload our kids, and it doesn’t matter that kids are crossing in the crosswalk and unloading in the cars ahead of us —we’ve got to get past them, we’ve got to get to where we’re going fast! Me first! Zoom!

  • Three-and-a-half months after it began, the 2010 Regular Session is set to reach the end this week as legislators meet for two days to consider any possible vetoes by Governor Beshear while debating a handful of other bills that could still become law.

  • The saying goes something like this ... “to err is human, to forgive divine.”

    I am a human being. And last week, I erred. In fact, I made a pretty fat mistake — in a headline no less.

    I misspelled Makayla James’ last name in a headline on Cindy DiFazio’s story about the 10-year-old and her love of riding horses.

    Then, I missed the misspelling in the lead paragraph of the story.

    First and foremost, Makayla, you have my sincere apologies.

  • There are a lot of reasons to love April – warm weather, Daffodils, bright yellow Forsythia bushes, Red Bud trees, and even Lilacs. But one of my April pleasures is April Fool’s Day, because it gives me an ideal opportunity to mess with my hubby’s mind.

  • When the Kentucky House of Representatives adopted its two-year budget several weeks ago, my colleagues and I had three main priorities: Streamline government; protect education and our most vulnerable citizens; and kick-start our economy.

  • I’m pleased to say that the most exciting thing I witnessed Monday night was the display of hoops excellence that was the Duke-Butler battle for the NCAA championship.

    Thanks to a subdued Pleasureville City Commission meeting, the game truly was the most exciting thing of the night.

    When last I wrote about the Pleasureville meeting, it definitely was not in a favorable light.

  • As many of you have heard or read, issues around the state’s budget have not yet been resolved.  The primary problem is that the Senate and the House Republicans are unwilling to issue $1.2 billion in additional debt and raise an additional $280 million in taxes.  We are simply not in a position to increase our debt load.

  • Oh, how I hate mowing the lawn!

    One morning this past week as I was driving down to Shelbyville to run some errands I was totally caught off guard by not one but two eager-beaver homeowners mowing their lawns.  I wanted to shout, “Relax, it’s only March, folks!”

  • As expected, the final full week of the 2010 Regular Session ended with the focus returning to the General Assembly’s top priority, the two-year state government budget.

    House and Senate leaders and I began working toward common ground on Wednesday afternoon, and if all goes as scheduled, a compromise should be ready for a final vote this week.

  • In the General Assembly during this time of year, “March Madness” refers to more than just a basketball tournament as the final hectic days of the legislative session draw to a close.

    In the state Senate, the focus last week was predictably on the two-year budget, with that chamber considering what changes it will make to the House version approved earlier this month.  The Senate is scheduled to vote on a proposal early this week, setting the stage for legislative leaders to come up with a compromise by the end of the month.

  • For several weeks, public service announcements have stressed the importance of completing the 2010 census forms which are arriving in the mail now.  It is vital that we participate.

    There is much at stake.  Billions of your tax dollars will be divided among the states based on census results.  Funding for education, transportation, Medicare, Medicaid, and other programs will be affected.

  • With the Primary Election in May quickly approaching, increasing national attention is being focused on Kentucky’s Senatorial race to replace retiring Republican Senator Jim Bunning. Two candidates vying to fill this office are Dr. Rand Paul and Kentucky Secretary of State Trey Grayson. The race is heating up and both are campaigning intensely to win support of Kentucky’s voters. On April 3 at Noon, both will be speaking during a Lincoln & Reagan Day Luncheon to be held at the General Butler State Park Conference Center in Carrollton, Kentucky.

  • It’s my firm belief that every camping or hiking trip will result in a strange or funny story.

    I’ve had my share over the years, including, most infamously: “Johnny, don’t pee on that tree ... pee on that one over there!” and “Allright! Straightenerup!” The second was uttered after midnight at a camping trip to General Butler State Park on Derby weekend in 2008.

  • After months of winter with its snow and cold, bulky coats, frozen windshields, school closings and slippery roads, almost all of us are eagerly looking forward to spring. We anticipate the pleasures of the warm sun, breezes scented with the awakening earth, and the surprise of crocuses and daffodils pushing their way up overnight. But the thing that comes to my mind in spring is mud. I, too, love warm weather, spring flowers and sunshine, but I admit it is mud that I connect most to spring

  • Is there anything we can do to help those in our community who are elderly, frail, without transportation, isolated from the population at large?

    We can aid in the continuation and expansion of the Meals on Wheels program that delivers healthy, nutritious food to their doorsteps almost every day of the week.

    Tri-County Community Action Agency currently serves an average of 55 homebound clients, ages 60+ in Henry, Oldham and Trimble counties.

    More than one-third of them live in Henry County and there is a waiting list.

  • In November 2009, our son, Noah, age 10, was diagnosed with a horrific type of childhood cancer. A tumor the size of a small cantaloupe was removed from his chest. Two weeks later he began a course of chemotherapy; every two weeks he checked into Kosair Children’s Hospital for five days for one treatment and then three days two weeks later. This schedule continued for six cycles. He then had one and one-half ribs removed and biopsied. We held our breaths until the pathology report came in-he was cancer free!

  • When it comes to education, few days in recent years could rival last Thursday, when the state learned in the morning that it is a “Race to the Top” finalist and the Kentucky House voted overwhelmingly that afternoon to begin raising the high school drop-out age from 16 to 18.

  • It was the strangest thing I’ve ever seen.

    Since I began working in newspapers more than a decade ago, I haven’t seen a meeting as nutty, as whacky, as out-of-control as last week’s meeting of the Pleasureville City Commission.

  • Why is our current health care system completely unable to control costs? For the same reason most Americans over-eat at buffets: when you don’t have to pay for each plate of food, you usually eat more. In recent decades, the percentage of health care spending paid “out of pocket” by patients has fallen substantially from 52 percent in 1965 to 15 percent in 2005.

  • My name is BreAuna Armstrong and I am an 8th grader at Eminence Middle School. Several months ago I began working on a Service Learning project for one of my classes. I decided to raise money for the Humane Society so I sat jars around town to collect donations.