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Opinion

  • I attended the Dare to Care food giveaway at the fairgrounds last month. It was a very needed and appreciated event. I want to thank the Dare to Care for all their hard work. Also, the county Judge (Executive) John Logan Brent and the Family Resource Center employees Renata Ingram and Debbie Hartford. Thank everyone for this caring event.

    Phyllis Brewer

     

  • This city has a crisis on its hands. The fire station. At this time, it is inoperable. The fire department has one tanker truck in there, hoping the water the truck carries and needs doesn’t freeze. This information I got first hand from a volunteer firefighter.

    Here is a fact that everyone needs to grasp ... Campbellsburg needs the fire department. It is one of three vital services we need for our safety and our very lives. Police, fire and ambulance services are the ones that answer our calls for help. Remember, they can truly make a difference whether you live or die.

  • I am writing about the appellate court that granted the (Danny) May appeal. I think you did a great job in your story. I hope that everyone who read that article will see that there are a lot of people that are not getting a fair deal. And thank God someone from the Court of Appeals took time to research May’s court record, and found in his favor. Glory be to God in the highest. I hope that everyone will respond to that article.

    Leora Curry

    Mayfield

  • I am writing in regard to the May appeal story because I am one of the few people who have seen the records that exist which contain certain statements made by the state that are in my opinion very wrong for a person of the court to make when they are involved in the case that decides the fate of that person.

  • After reading the Dec. 9, 2009 article published on the case against Danny May, I begin to wonder what happened to our “fair and impartial” Judicial system.  If something like this can happen to a guy like Danny, whom I’ve known for more than 15 years, then it could happen to just about anybody.

    I didn’t want to believe that someone with an outlook on life like Danny  could have ever done such things, but at the same time I began to have my doubts towards his innocence after his conviction.

  • I assure you that I did not intend to herald in a new year and a new decade on a negative note but some recent circumstances have provoked me to the point where I feel compelled to vent a little. It’s about Rumpke trash cans — let me explain.

  • After reading last week’s editorial in the Henry County Local, I feel I should address some of the issues raised.

  • For all Henry County residents there are two new opportunities for assistance that you may be interested in.  First, on the last Wednesday of each month the Dare to Care Mobile Food Pantry will be at the Henry County Fairgrounds from 3 to 6 p.m. The Henry County and Eminence Schools Family Resource Centers have taken the lead on this new program and are doing an excellent job with it. The mobile pantry came to Henry County for the first time last month. It served an estimated 250 people, providing them with a box of food which included meat and potatoes.

  • At the end of the year, and with an eye on the beginning of another legislative session, the General Assembly often receives studies from a handful of special committees formed to study a single issue.

    2009 was no different, with at least five providing their findings in recent weeks.  Energy was the driving force behind two, while education and the economy were the focus of the other three.

  • With all due respect to Campbellsburg City Council member Rex Morgan, the lack of urinals at the Campbellsburg Fire Department is, in itself, far from a travesty.

    The travesty is that months after reconstruction of the station began, problems still are cropping up. If the bidding process was any indication, this shouldn’t be a surprise.

  • We want to thank everyone who helped in any way to once again make sure the ministry of the Bethlehem Living Nativity keeps going.

    This portrayal of our savior Jesus Christ’s birth is now 51 years old.

    Without all your help and support these many years, this would surely not have been possible.

    Again, thank you so much. May God bless each of you.

    Bethlehem Living Nativity Committee

     

  • The other day I overheard a conversation in the grocery store while waiting in line to check out. A woman was saying that Christmas is for children, and her listener clucked her tongue and said that she certainly had to agree. I have heard this sad assessment of the holiday season before, but I am always taken aback. 

    Certainly, the religious significance of the Christmas season does not fade as one ages. If anything, it may deepen as you become stronger in your faith. I am sure there are many heartfelt sermons delivered on that very topic each December.

  • As for the maintenance of the properties in Pleasureville if you had listented to what I said I am 100 percent for keeping our town looking good, the trash picked up and the yards mowed. I am not for putting a lien on someone’s property because they don’t have the money to put siding on their house. I think we have bigger things to worry about like the Pool Room was broken into; the hardware store was broken into; the post office, someone used the bathroom and wiped it on everything; a car was stolen. But they say we don’t need a police officer.

  • This year for the first time in my 55 years I will not be in Henry County in the days before Christmas which means that for the first time I can remember since I was a teenager, I will not stand in the Bethlehem Living Nativity.

    I am happy to have my husband and daughters and in-laws to share Christmas Day here in Memphis — and we will cross the rivers and woods on Dec. 26 to reach my folks’ Henry County farm for another celebration with four generations of Clubbs.

  • Did you hear? A couple of weeks ago, on Nov. 30, the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the Kentucky State Police raided the Henry County Courthouse. They took computers and financial records.

    No, wait, that’s not right.

    They raided Henry County Planning and Zoning and, in addition to taking computers and financial records, shut the Planning and Zoning office down.

    You didn’t hear that? Hmm. If you didn’t, you must have been under a rock a couple weeks ago.

  • I attended the last two meetings of the Pleasureville City Council where the issue of property maintenance and police protection was discussed in length by both the citizens in attendance and the members of the city council.  This has been a hot topic in the city for several years.

  • Last week someone wrote a Letter to the Editor entitled “Jesus is a Liberal.”  To say that Jesus was a liberal is to say that the Bible is a liberal publication.  This statement cannot be farther from the truth.  You can read in the Book of Judges that the Jewish people were self-governed.  They had no formal government.  Liberals constantly want larger government with more regulation and higher taxes as a result.  When we read 1 Samuel, we find the Israelites asking God for a king.  God explains to them that they are to be set apart from other

  • Thankfully, the nation is not gripped in an energy crisis that drives up home heating costs this winter. Experts predict that Kentuckians can expect to pay about 39 percent less for natural gas than they paid last winter as natural gas prices drop to their lowest levels in six years. The cost of electric heat, heating oil and propane has also declined this year, meaning smaller bills and bigger savings for many households.

  • We are now halfway through the registration period for the 2010 election cycle. For anyone considering running for any countywide public office, you have until Jan. 26 to register at the Henry County Clerk’s office.

    The next Henry County Republican Party meeting will be held in the new Henry County High School cafeteria at 7 p.m. on Dec. 15. In lieu of our standard agenda, Kentucky Secretary of State Trey Grayson will be attending the meeting to discuss and answer any questions about the election process.

  • A month ago, there was a dust-up in Frankfort regarding what to call the evergreen tree that traditionally stands in the front of the Capitol every Christmas season.  For most of us, this symbol of the renewal and promise of Christ’s birth is called the Christmas Tree. Regrettably, in a misguided attempt to be politically correct, the Governor decided to be the first Kentucky Governor to call it a Holiday Tree.  This change spurred disappointment and even anger throughout the Commonwealth. Thousands joined a Facebook page urging the Governor to reconsider.