.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Opinion

  • For several weeks, public service announcements have stressed the importance of completing the 2010 census forms which are arriving in the mail now.  It is vital that we participate.

    There is much at stake.  Billions of your tax dollars will be divided among the states based on census results.  Funding for education, transportation, Medicare, Medicaid, and other programs will be affected.

  • With the Primary Election in May quickly approaching, increasing national attention is being focused on Kentucky’s Senatorial race to replace retiring Republican Senator Jim Bunning. Two candidates vying to fill this office are Dr. Rand Paul and Kentucky Secretary of State Trey Grayson. The race is heating up and both are campaigning intensely to win support of Kentucky’s voters. On April 3 at Noon, both will be speaking during a Lincoln & Reagan Day Luncheon to be held at the General Butler State Park Conference Center in Carrollton, Kentucky.

  • It’s my firm belief that every camping or hiking trip will result in a strange or funny story.

    I’ve had my share over the years, including, most infamously: “Johnny, don’t pee on that tree ... pee on that one over there!” and “Allright! Straightenerup!” The second was uttered after midnight at a camping trip to General Butler State Park on Derby weekend in 2008.

  • After months of winter with its snow and cold, bulky coats, frozen windshields, school closings and slippery roads, almost all of us are eagerly looking forward to spring. We anticipate the pleasures of the warm sun, breezes scented with the awakening earth, and the surprise of crocuses and daffodils pushing their way up overnight. But the thing that comes to my mind in spring is mud. I, too, love warm weather, spring flowers and sunshine, but I admit it is mud that I connect most to spring

  • Is there anything we can do to help those in our community who are elderly, frail, without transportation, isolated from the population at large?

    We can aid in the continuation and expansion of the Meals on Wheels program that delivers healthy, nutritious food to their doorsteps almost every day of the week.

    Tri-County Community Action Agency currently serves an average of 55 homebound clients, ages 60+ in Henry, Oldham and Trimble counties.

    More than one-third of them live in Henry County and there is a waiting list.

  • In November 2009, our son, Noah, age 10, was diagnosed with a horrific type of childhood cancer. A tumor the size of a small cantaloupe was removed from his chest. Two weeks later he began a course of chemotherapy; every two weeks he checked into Kosair Children’s Hospital for five days for one treatment and then three days two weeks later. This schedule continued for six cycles. He then had one and one-half ribs removed and biopsied. We held our breaths until the pathology report came in-he was cancer free!

  • When it comes to education, few days in recent years could rival last Thursday, when the state learned in the morning that it is a “Race to the Top” finalist and the Kentucky House voted overwhelmingly that afternoon to begin raising the high school drop-out age from 16 to 18.

  • It was the strangest thing I’ve ever seen.

    Since I began working in newspapers more than a decade ago, I haven’t seen a meeting as nutty, as whacky, as out-of-control as last week’s meeting of the Pleasureville City Commission.

  • Why is our current health care system completely unable to control costs? For the same reason most Americans over-eat at buffets: when you don’t have to pay for each plate of food, you usually eat more. In recent decades, the percentage of health care spending paid “out of pocket” by patients has fallen substantially from 52 percent in 1965 to 15 percent in 2005.

  • My name is BreAuna Armstrong and I am an 8th grader at Eminence Middle School. Several months ago I began working on a Service Learning project for one of my classes. I decided to raise money for the Humane Society so I sat jars around town to collect donations. 

  • A prominent psychologist named Abraham Maslow coined a phrase for those occasional brief occurrences in life when circumstances seem to produce a sense of complete well being. Maslow called such ecstatic feelings peak experiences. While all of us suffer tragedies in our lives — I’ve certainly had mine — most of us also have peak experiences now and then, perhaps some more than others.

  • In the Summer of 2009, Henry County began to enjoy the benefits of an expanded recycling opportunity. Our County Judge and Fiscal Court included in the last garbage collection franchise a provision that required the successful bidder to locate recycling collection bins at various sites around the county. I want to reiterate my appreciation to them for doing this. As a result, we all have the opportunity to recycle glass, tin cans, aluminum cans, newspaper, cardboard, plastic bottles, plastic containers and many other recyclable items without driving as far as was once necessary.

  • Last week, as House leaders and I continued working on the final details of a budget plan that should be ready soon for a vote, the spotlight fell on our Judiciary Committee.

    On Wednesday, it approved two bills that have gotten a lot of attention lately, and both deal with our younger citizens.

  • My name is Corey Roberts and I go to Eminence Middle School. I am doing my eighth grade service-learning project on anti-bullying. During the week of Feb. 22–26, our school will be an “anti-bully zone.” We will be having poster contests for elementary students and poem contests for middle and high school students, with prizes being awarded to the winners. Thank you to Cook’s, Steel Technologies and Perry’s Tri-County Hardware and Lumber for donating money for prizes for the poster and poem winners.

  • Did you know that, on average, each American earns enough income to pay for their annual food supply in just 37 days? That’s just over 10 percent of our income. America’s farmers are unmatched in their ability to consistently produce an abundance of affordable food. And they continue to do this despite significant challenges and uncertainty on a daily basis, including inclement weather, damaging insects and other challenges.

  • Please allow me to take this opportunity to publicly thank Henry County Sheriff’s Deputy and Henry County School Resource Officer Mike Lucas and Kentucky State Police Trooper Michael Webb. Both men recently spoke at a Youth Coalition training session, sharing information with the members about current alcohol and drug abuse in the community, as well as other high-risk activities and even crimes in which young people in our community are engaged.

  • Last week, as snow continued to fall, covering not just the landscape but the roads, I was one of those lunatics in the car and on the road — I had to work.

    I fell madly in love with our car last week, as its four-wheel drive held true, and there was nowhere I couldn’t go.

    But still, it was the hard, long, and undoubtedly cold work of a select group of folks that really helped make it possible.

    They had a job that, at times, had to be incredibly frustrating, as snow fell faster than it could be plowed, and then drifted back in tidal waves.

  • Each legislative session, the General Assembly spends much of its time focusing on three areas: education, the economy and public protection.

    It was the latter two that generated the most discussion in the state House last week.

  • My name is Sean Hoagland and I am an eighth grader at Eminence Middle School. I would like to get information on asking for community help with the Humane Society.  I am doing a community project for school and chose the Humane Society because of my love of animals.  Since volunteering at the Shelby Co. Humane Society (Henry Co. directed me there since their volunteer coordinator had a family illness), I have found out there is a huge need for donations.  The society runs on donations which are down due to our hard economy.

  • When I was a young girl growing up on a farm in upstate New York, my folks had a hired man named Shel Aikley. Given the custom in those days and the fact that he was probably 40 years older than I was, I always politely addressed him as “Mr. Aikley.” He gave me the feeling that he was fond of me, and, sure enough, years later at my wedding, he wept openly, as if he’d been my uncle.