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Opinion

  • The first priorities of the General Assembly may be to write the law and the budget that guides state government, but it also has an oversight responsibility as well.

    Over the years that has led to the creation of eight committees that monitor a variety of programs, ranging from Medicaid to the way we spend our portion of the multi-billion dollar settlement the states reached with the major tobacco companies in the late 1990s.

  • I know many of you in Henry and surrounding counties have seen or signed a petition to remove Greg Derossett from his current position, or any other position that he may hold in this county. I am concerned that many of you do not know the whole story as to why this petition is being passed around by Mr. Bob Cook who resides on Scobie Lane in New Castle.

  • Having a few problems here in Henry County. You might remember us if you read the article about the windmills and solar in the Henry County Local. I don’t know how many of you have run across this but here goes. My wife and I are both disabled, we had to put up the wind and solar, and then started building our home. Because of a horse back riding accident with my wife, it was delayed in starting.

  • For months, members of Congress and the American public have hotly debated the right way to reform our health care system.  We all agree that there are steps that can be taken to improve health care to make it more affordable and accessible, but the devil is in the details.  It is critical that we find the right prescription for reform without adding to our climbing debt and deficit. One of the essential elements to successful reform that will reduce cost within our current health care system is comprehensive medical liability reform “tort reform.”

  • The Henry County KY-ASAP local board is a group of community leaders dedicated to developing policies that reduce substance use in Henry County. In keeping with that mission, we would like to introduce our new mini-grant funding opportunity. Our goal is simple: to support activities, programs, events or even budding ideas that encourage successful future generations in Henry County.

  • I would like to invite and encourage everyone to attend the third annual Eminence Halloween Festival. This year it will be taking place on Friday, Oct. 30 from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Highland Renaissance Park. The admission is free but I encourage everyone to bring one canned good to be donated to the local food pantry.

  • Nearly everybody seems to have some set of personal values they follow to guide their actions, whether consciously or unconsciously. Those values surely vary some from individual to individual, but I am pretty sure that almost all of us value such traits as honesty, faithfulness and fairness in our dealings with others. Maybe there are sociopaths that don’t have much of a conscience, but I wouldn’t know about that. 

  • Americans are counting on Congress to craft legislation that will effectively and responsibly address critical issues.  Unfortunately, on the most important matters of the day, like the economy, energy and health care, Democrat majority leaders have been consistently unwilling to allow an open process that results in the practical and effective solutions that the people want from their representatives.

  • In many ways, the modern era of environmental awareness began in the early 1970s, with the start of Earth Day and the congressional passage of the Clean Air and Clean Water acts.

    For Kentucky, 1972 was a pivotal year because that was when the Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Cabinet was created.  Another milestone came four years later, when the first Governor’s Conference on the Environment was held.

  • I am writing this letter in reference to the uproar over EPD Chief Carey Duncan shooting a dog.

    It has always been my belief that actions speak louder than words. I have known Carey Duncan for about 30 years, and his actions have always been that of a professional and courteous officer of the law.

  • Readers will remember that we sent in a letter about three weeks ago, asking for help in purchasing medals to present to our veterans at this year’s Veterans Day assembly.  This is to update everyone that we no longer are asking for donations — we met (and exceeded) our goal, a week ahead of schedule!

  • After reading the “Busted!” article on the front page of the Sept.

  • Since President Obama’s address to the Joint Session of Congress on Sept. 9, there have been many conflicting reports about whether illegal immigrants would be able to access the health care benefits included in the reform legislation being considered in the House of Representatives.

    Despite the President’s pledge that his plan for health care reform “would not apply to those who are here illegally,” H.R. 3200 does not do enough to satisfy the President’s standard.

  • My father-in-law, a gentle, old-fashioned country doctor, had three attitudes that he referred to as his “prescription for a happy life.” He lived by them and he urged them on his patients, his children, and, of course, on their spouses. They were: 1) Think highly of yourself; 2) Never feel sorry for yourself, and; 3) Don’t take life too seriously. As my father-in-law was a wise and happy man, my husband and I tried to pass his prescription on to our own children.

  • I just want to take the time to thank the Silver Wings Band for donating their time to come help raise money for the Eminence Middle School cheerleaders. They did an awesome job! Also I want to take the time to thank the people that did show up to support these girls. We do appreciate the school for allowing us to use the gym to have this benefit. What really bothers me is the lack of support from the school personnel and the community. It would have been an awesome turn out if we would have had more support from the two.

  • One of the most positive gains farming has made over the last decade has been its partnership with another of our signature industries: tourism.

    To get a better understanding of just how much agritourism has grown during that time, consider that it accounted for about $1 million in income in 2001, but $3.2 million by 2007.

    September in Kentucky is Agritourism Month, which is appropriate since the fall festival season is the most popular time of year for farms that open their doors to the public.

  • As eighth graders at Eminence Middle School, we are required to do a service learning project that benefits our local or global community.

  • I want to remind everyone about the open house and reunion to be held at the Old English Schoolhouse in English, Ky., on Oct. 3, beginning at 9 a.m.

    This will be a great opportunity to reconnect with your former classmates. I for one am looking forward to seeing my classmates.

    There will be entertainment for the children, food and drinks for purchase, a tour of the building, no admission fee and lots of friends to meet and greet.

    Remember, it’s Oct. 3, from 9 a.m. to ?

    I hope to see you there!

  • Last week was not much fun in the Priester household.

    Two of our vehicles went down to various problems within a 24-hour period.

    The adventure to pick Derek up from the bike mechanic’s shop was, well, lengthy and frustrating. What should have been a 2.5 hour “quick” trip, turned into more than four.

    Then, the next morning, as I drove our truck in to get a repair, it overheated.

    On Tuesday. Our busiest day of the week.

  • As Kentucky looks for ways to truly overcome two of its most persistent challenges – poverty and dropping out of school – last Friday may be judged by history as a true turning point.

    That is because, early in the day, legislative leaders announced the formation of a new Task Force on Poverty, and that evening, First Lady Jane Beshear kicked off a two-day conference that focused on the best ways to help students graduate.