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Opinion

  • This year for the first time in my 55 years I will not be in Henry County in the days before Christmas which means that for the first time I can remember since I was a teenager, I will not stand in the Bethlehem Living Nativity.

    I am happy to have my husband and daughters and in-laws to share Christmas Day here in Memphis — and we will cross the rivers and woods on Dec. 26 to reach my folks’ Henry County farm for another celebration with four generations of Clubbs.

  • Did you hear? A couple of weeks ago, on Nov. 30, the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the Kentucky State Police raided the Henry County Courthouse. They took computers and financial records.

    No, wait, that’s not right.

    They raided Henry County Planning and Zoning and, in addition to taking computers and financial records, shut the Planning and Zoning office down.

    You didn’t hear that? Hmm. If you didn’t, you must have been under a rock a couple weeks ago.

  • I attended the last two meetings of the Pleasureville City Council where the issue of property maintenance and police protection was discussed in length by both the citizens in attendance and the members of the city council.  This has been a hot topic in the city for several years.

  • Last week someone wrote a Letter to the Editor entitled “Jesus is a Liberal.”  To say that Jesus was a liberal is to say that the Bible is a liberal publication.  This statement cannot be farther from the truth.  You can read in the Book of Judges that the Jewish people were self-governed.  They had no formal government.  Liberals constantly want larger government with more regulation and higher taxes as a result.  When we read 1 Samuel, we find the Israelites asking God for a king.  God explains to them that they are to be set apart from other

  • Thankfully, the nation is not gripped in an energy crisis that drives up home heating costs this winter. Experts predict that Kentuckians can expect to pay about 39 percent less for natural gas than they paid last winter as natural gas prices drop to their lowest levels in six years. The cost of electric heat, heating oil and propane has also declined this year, meaning smaller bills and bigger savings for many households.

  • We are now halfway through the registration period for the 2010 election cycle. For anyone considering running for any countywide public office, you have until Jan. 26 to register at the Henry County Clerk’s office.

    The next Henry County Republican Party meeting will be held in the new Henry County High School cafeteria at 7 p.m. on Dec. 15. In lieu of our standard agenda, Kentucky Secretary of State Trey Grayson will be attending the meeting to discuss and answer any questions about the election process.

  • A month ago, there was a dust-up in Frankfort regarding what to call the evergreen tree that traditionally stands in the front of the Capitol every Christmas season.  For most of us, this symbol of the renewal and promise of Christ’s birth is called the Christmas Tree. Regrettably, in a misguided attempt to be politically correct, the Governor decided to be the first Kentucky Governor to call it a Holiday Tree.  This change spurred disappointment and even anger throughout the Commonwealth. Thousands joined a Facebook page urging the Governor to reconsider.

  • In the spirit of the holiday season, I have decided to give candy-making one more try this year. It just seems like such a festive undertaking, and I have collected some very pretty containers in the past few years that would be perfect to fill with homemade candy and give away to friends as Christmas gifts.

  • As we gather with family and friends to celebrate the season, it is important to take time to remember the brave men and women in uniform who cannot be home with their loved ones during the holidays because they are serving our country abroad.

    This year, about 285,000 American troops will serve overseas during the holidays, including more than 6,400 from Kentucky.  Fortunately, there are many ways we can show our support and share the Christmas spirit with our nation’s service men and women.

  • During my relatively short time in newspapers, I’ve been welcomed into countless homes.

    I’ve been welcomed into homes great and small, opulent and sparse. I’ve been welcomed into homes by those who are sick and dying, and by those who are healthy and living life to its fullest.

    And last week, I was welcomed into the home of Tony and Connie Hernandez. Theirs is a home full of love, life, joy and laughter.

    The family is, to put it simply, amazing.

  • One of the most challenging problems facing state government these days is our sky-rocketing prison population.

    This decade alone, the number of inmates has risen nearly 50 percent, while costs have gone up by more than half.  In the last fiscal year, we spent $450 million to house more than 21,000 prisoners, a population roughly the same size as our 17th largest city.

    In January, the legislature’s Program Review and Investigations Committee began taking a closer look at the reasons behind this surge.

  • Jesus did not ask the blind man or the leper, “give me your silver pieces and THEN I will heal you.”  Health care in this country is bought and sold at the marketplace for profit like any other private consumption good at the expense of human lives. Yet, we claim to be a Christian nation.  122 people die each day in the US due to lack of access to health care; that number is far greater than those who died on 911 and the death toll continues to rise. Where is the memorial to these fellow Americans?

  • The White House says it has good reasons to bring the terrorists who planned the 9/11 attacks to New York City to try them in a federal courtroom instead of at the secure detention facility at Guantanamo. But I can’t think of any.

    The reasons why that decision is a mistake, however, are easy to list. It puts the tools we use to fight terror at risk. And it is a needless risk to America’s security. And it gives these terrorists a worldwide platform to spread their hateful propaganda.

  • Dennis Prager, a well-known author and radio talk-show host, has written that gratitude is the key to happiness. Here is how he has put it:

    “There is a ‘secret to happiness’ and it is gratitude. All happy people are grateful, and ungrateful people cannot be happy. We tend to think that it is being unhappy that leads people to complain, but it is truer to say that it is complaining that leads to people becoming unhappy. Become grateful and you will become a much happier person.”

  • The local political season has started. To inform the interested, it is time for those who want to be active in their local, state or federal government to enter the system by applying for a position from now until Jan. 26 at 4 p.m. Either join us at our meetings or go to the Henry County Clerks Office for the forms and information to join the process.

  • It is hard to believe that three-fourths of the year is already over.  With that said, it is time for the annual New Castle Fall Fling, Saturday, Oct. 3, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. in historic New Castle. 

  • Although Speaker Pelosi’s flawed 1,990 page health care bill (H.R. 3962) passed the House on Nov. 7, the debate on health care reform is far from over. 

    We need health care legislation that will give the American people the reform they have asked for: fix what is broken in our health care system, reduce cost and increase access to health insurance.  That is why my Republican colleagues and I introduced the Common Sense Health Reform and Affordability Act (H.R. 4038).

  • I am, typically, a patient person. I don’t easily lose my temper, nor do I get frustrated quickly.

    But last week, my patience was tested.

    Ten years ago, I started making baklava. For the uninitiated, baklava is a glorious combination of phyllo dough, honey, nuts and spices. It is rich, sweet, crunchy, and unbelievably delicious.

    I was introduced to this heavenly concoction as a kiddo when my mother toted me to an Helenic festival in Evansville. There, we found gobs of the stuff, and it was love at first munch.

  • I have often heard Henry Countians express their belief in traditional values, in their appreciation for the old ways, and their respect for the past. However, for a community as deeply rooted in what is perceived as tradition, it is very sad to see so little care taken of the physical reminders of where we have been and who we are.

  • A woman and her pocketbook share a unique bond. A pocketbook serves not only as a carrying case for any number of “necessary” items, it is also a fashion statement, and in some ways a reflection of her personality. A woman is apt to fuss about her purse now and then while a man will tend to carry around the same old wallet until it is so worn that bills start falling out. Most women need a frequent change in purses.