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Opinion

  • Wow! What an interesting year this has been so far! We have been lucky enough to have some wonderful volunteers at Tri-County Community Action Agency. The citizens of our community have really been an asset to our seniors; however, we need a few more to assist in the aging services programs. As an incentive, Sage Hospitality is offering a free or discounted hotel stay in any of their 53 hotels in exchange for 8 hours of volunteer service at a 501(c)3 organization (that’s us!). They call it Give a day Get a night and it is in effect until December 20, 2009.

  • It was the popular question last week. “Have you floated away yet?”

    No, I told my mother, we hadn’t. We live on a hill. Sort of.

    After two years of scorching summers with not nearly enough rain to suit the tastes of local farmers, this has been one water-logged summer.

    And as much as I know we need rain — but not in 1 inch, 30-minute downpours — sometimes I look at the sky and ask if enough isn’t enough already.

    The wild storms have given me some time to practice lightning photography ... with frustrating results.

  • Last week brought about many very positive changes for students and parents of Henry County High School and Middle School.  One change appreciated by all is the turning lane that was installed in front of the middle school and high school campus.  As anyone who travels that route can tell you, it is a very welcome addition.  Parents, students, staff, bus drivers, community members and others just passing through are experiencing a much safer commute because of the efforts of State Representative Rick Rand, County Judge Executive John Logan Brent, and

  • Kentucky may technically be a land-locked state, but it certainly does not lack in shoreline.  Lake Cumberland alone, for example, has almost as much as our country’s entire Pacific coast, all 1,293 miles of it.

    No state outside of Alaska has more streams and rivers, and our 1,500 miles of navigable waterways are double the length of our interstates.

    In other words, we know water.

    It was with that thought in mind that House and Senate leaders decided earlier this year to create a committee dedicated solely to our streams, rivers and lakes.

  • We can all agree America needs healthcare reform, and an important debate is taking place in this country about how to best achieve that. I think answers can be found in the story of the government’s “Cash for Clunkers” and stimulus programs. The problems with these programs show why Americans are right to be skeptical of a government takeover of health care.

  • Congratulations to the Eminence Independent Schools for hiring Bill Covington and giving him a second chance! We in Eminence are so fortunate to have a fine school and dedicated school board. Our chairman has served many years, surely does not give up easily. I would certainly hope every man should have respect and deserves a second chance in life.

    Now, my question, should this subject be the lead article in the county weekly newspaper?

    Carolyn Giltner,

    Eminence

     

  • I have to say, I’m disappointed in this headline and its negativity.  As a member of the community, president of the local bank, athletic booster, volunteer coach and parent, Bill Covington made numerous contributions to Eminence Independent Schools, the City of Eminence and Henry County. I think it speaks volumes for his character that he wants to come back to Eminence and make additional contributions to the school, the students and the future of our community, all the while knowing that there will be some people who just can’t move on.

  • John Allgeier: A family man, a community man and a great person. While a magistrate, he was an active member of the Kentucky Magistrates and Commissioners Association and made many contributions to it. He believed in the purpose of the association and was always willing to help it along.

  • Having a national debate on health care reform is welcomed by President Obama. The trouble is, no sooner does the President call for “everyone to pitch in” and engage in the debate, that he vilifies anyone who criticizes his plans. Having a civil national debate will produce more lasting change; accusing opponents of engaging in scare tactics and fear mongering will not.

  • I was very sorry you chose to have the front page bold print July 29, 2009, Local edition state “From bank to jail to classroom.” This article was totally uncalled for and was about Bill Covington, former president of the Farmers Deposit Bank.

  • With the recent death of former Henry County Magistrate John Allgeier, Henry County lost one of our truly dedicated citizens. Words can not express how much his friendship meant to me and to so many others whose lives he touched. Maybe he did a wedding for you or a family member. Maybe you called him about a road that needed repairing, or you met him while he was serving as a volunteer fireman.  Maybe he told you a joke, or laughed with you at the stock yard sales. Maybe he was just there when you needed a friend.

  • The hiring of Bill Covington for EIS Special Education Teacher reinforces my continued admiration for the Eminence School Board, the Administration and Site Based Council.  Mr. Covington is a distinguished educator and since 1983 has tirelessly served the school as a coach, mentor to numerous youth, teachers and the administrative staff.  Mr. Covington’s financial support enabled scholarships, enhanced many programs and helped make EIS become the respected institution we have now.

  • Any successful health care reform legislation must include three basic components: reform of existing government health care programs (like Medicaid and Medicare) to ensure efficiency and accessibility, reform the private market insurance system and enact tort reform to end frivolous lawsuits.  Without all three, we will fail in our shared goal of reducing health care costs for families, businesses and the government.

  • Normally, mid-summer is not the time many of us think about weatherizing our homes, even if cooler temperatures in recent days have felt more like early fall.

    If making our homes more energy efficient and saving money weren’t enough, there are 70 million more reasons why Kentuckians should start thinking about taking on energy-saving projects.  That is the amount of money Kentucky could receive for this program from the federal stimulus package that Congress approved in February to help local and state economies.

  • Our lead story this week is about a man who many have told me is a good man. A good man who, unfortunately, did a bad thing.

    By many accounts, William J. Covington is a good person, a good community member. Some say the fact that he was convicted of bank fraud in U.S. District Court last year reflects only that his good intentions led him astray.

    Nonetheless, Mr. Covington plead to, and was convicted of, a very serious federal charge.

  • My husband and I arrived at the Fairgrounds early Sat. morning for the ham breakfast — which was totally awesome.  We left about ll when the black clouds started rolling in, but we had a wonderful time looking at all the exhibits and animals,  talking with the Sheriff, the leather maker and the beautiful little lady from New Castle Methodist church who made the quilts, etc. My husand enjoyed the old tractors and I enjoyed Patrick Henry Hughes so much — what a wonderfully inspiring young man.

  • For years now, Kentucky has regularly been regarded as a safe state.  The U.S. Census Bureau, for example, says we have the nation’s 10th lowest violent crime rate.

    Unfortunately, there are still far too many instances of those who find themselves on the wrong side of the law.  According to the Kentucky State Police’s latest annual statewide report, a serious crime occurred every four minutes and 15 seconds in 2008, for 122,000 overall.

  • Opening the refrigerator this morning to get cream for my coffee, I saw IT again on the second shelf near the back.

    It is a half of a honeydew melon that for some reason has no sweetness. I made myself finish the first piece for breakfast two days ago and then I ate another slice for a pick-me-up that afternoon, but I just can’t bring myself to eat any more of it and, as my husband has no interest, it sits there in the refrigerator.

  • In June, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi successfully forced passage of controversial cap and trade legislation (H.R. 2454) that will cost American families thousands of dollars each year in new energy costs.  This legislation creates a national energy tax that is expected to increase utility bills, raise the price of a gallon of gas, push food prices to new heights and generally increase the cost of nearly every consumer product, including health care.

  • Our health care system is in need of reform.  Health care costs are too expensive and many families do not have access to the affordable, high-quality health care that they deserve.  In the coming weeks and months, Congress will debate health care reform proposals.  As a father of six and a former small business owner, ensuring access to quality health care is one of my top priorities.