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Opinion

  • For years now, Kentucky has regularly been regarded as a safe state.  The U.S. Census Bureau, for example, says we have the nation’s 10th lowest violent crime rate.

    Unfortunately, there are still far too many instances of those who find themselves on the wrong side of the law.  According to the Kentucky State Police’s latest annual statewide report, a serious crime occurred every four minutes and 15 seconds in 2008, for 122,000 overall.

  • Opening the refrigerator this morning to get cream for my coffee, I saw IT again on the second shelf near the back.

    It is a half of a honeydew melon that for some reason has no sweetness. I made myself finish the first piece for breakfast two days ago and then I ate another slice for a pick-me-up that afternoon, but I just can’t bring myself to eat any more of it and, as my husband has no interest, it sits there in the refrigerator.

  • In June, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi successfully forced passage of controversial cap and trade legislation (H.R. 2454) that will cost American families thousands of dollars each year in new energy costs.  This legislation creates a national energy tax that is expected to increase utility bills, raise the price of a gallon of gas, push food prices to new heights and generally increase the cost of nearly every consumer product, including health care.

  • Our health care system is in need of reform.  Health care costs are too expensive and many families do not have access to the affordable, high-quality health care that they deserve.  In the coming weeks and months, Congress will debate health care reform proposals.  As a father of six and a former small business owner, ensuring access to quality health care is one of my top priorities.

  • Last Thursday, Kentucky got the latest snapshot of just how much we have been affected by the nation’s ongoing housing crisis.

    While the news could certainly be better, the report approved that day by the General Assembly’s Program Review and Investigations Committee found that Kentucky is nonetheless seeing fewer problems than many states, especially those along or near the coasts.

  • In Jim Carrey’s latest movie, “Yes Man,” Carrey portrays a habitual naysayer who takes an oath to change his life by saying “yes” to everything.

    Manically, he addresses the library bulletin board postings. “Do I want to learn Korean - yes, do I want to learn to play guitar - yes.”

    I have developed a similar relationship with the Henry County Library. Its adult offerings tantalize me.

    Do I want to attend the Film Discussion Series screening of “The Godfather” and eat free cannelloni - yes!

  • One of the biggest changes Kentucky schools have seen since the start of the decade is the growing need for special education programs.

    While the overall school population grew 2.8 percent from 2000 to 2007, the number of those qualifying for special education programs grew by more than 15 percent, to nearly 108,000 students.  The fastest-growing segment was in the three- to five-year-old range, which went up by more than a fourth.

  • I would like to thank everyone who came out to the 27th Annual New Castle Spring Fling on Sat., June 13.  The weather cooperated with us and we had a huge crowd and a lot of wonderful vendors.   

    With this being my 15th year as head of the New Castle Festivals,  I have seen a lot change over the years but our festivals are still going strong thanks to a lot of help from the people listed below.

  • The recent death of the famous entertainer has saddened me. Of course, I would never diminish the severity or shamefulness of indiscretions with children, but while such acts are reprehensible, we can only speculate about whether those accusations against the superstar were true. What I lament is the untimely death of a very talented man, and what bothers me most is the emotional deprivation he suffered in his youth, which obviously haunted him all his life.

  • Music on Main is this Friday night. The City of Eminence wants to invite everyone to attend. This is a night full of fellowship, food, fun and live music. The live music will be provided by two very popular bands- Robbie Cox and Leo Mason will both be playing! Robbie will start the night at 7 p.m. and play for a couple of hours. Then Leo Mason will finish the night off and hopefully he will play one of my favorite songs- Mustang Sally! The food will be provided by Wesley and Patricia Morrison’s new business called- Hot Diggity Dawgs! There will also be some fun for the kids.

  • WOW!  The 2009 Henry County Relay For Life has come and gone, but the hard work and funds raised will be remembered!  Henry County YOU raised over $90,000 and the money is still coming in – WAY TO GO!!!  We hear about hard economic times, about how people just don’t care anymore – well, the people who say those things don’t know the generosity and compassion of Henry Countians!  There are so many people to thank, and though we hope not to miss anyone, we are sure we will so please, forgive us in advance.

  • This spring I received calls from the Pendleton County and Owen County Judges saying they had been told we were the county to call with questions about running an efficient EMS service.  On June 18, I polled the surrounding counties about where their services stood financially.  As you read these numbers, I think you will see why our EMS service is the envy of the other counties.  Here are the findings of revenues versus expenses:  Carroll - $176,256 shortfall, Owen - $72,000 shortfall, Franklin -$355,000 shortfall, Shelby - $479,800 shortfall, Oldham - $2,838,292 subsid

  • Creative, relentless, awe-inspiring are some of the adjectives describing these 2009 Team Captains whose diligent efforts made the 2009 Henry County Relay for Life a success.  Thank you, Team Captains, for your hard work.  Together we are making a difference in the fight against cancer.

  • General Manager

    One of the things I consider to be interesting about what I do for a living is covering meetings.

    Oh, they’re not necessarily fun, but they are very important. And I learned a long time ago that sometimes people will say the darndest things in public meetings. Usually it results in spectators saying, “Wait a minute, what did he just say?”

  • I am very upset that New Castle Spring Fling did not get the billing (it deserved). It is one of the most important festivals of the year.

    They work hard for five months to get the bands and singers, the food booths, and flea markets, all the games and the silent auction, parade. They work very hard to give you a nice day to enjoy and have fun.

    I think we should give a big thank you to them.

    Mary K. Henson

    New Castle

     

  • My husband and I have always had many things in common. We share a love for books, old country music, the peace and quiet of rural living, and spending time with our children and grandchildren. For the most part, our values and outlooks on life are in sync.  Neither of us is particularly hotheaded, and we both feel a sense of humor is necessary to cope with life’s inevitable frustrations. But when it comes to dietary issues, we are exact opposites. We’re like Jack Sprat and his wife from the old nursery rhyme.

    Jack Sprat could eat no fat,

  • Through the Internet, kids can access online educational resources from some of our nation’s greatest institutions, like the Library of Congress and the Smithsonian Museums.  The Internet also helps kids with homework and research projects, provides them with instant information about community events and local activities, and connects them with friends around the world.  While the Internet is a valuable tool in our children’s lives, as parents, we must be conscious of its potential dangers.

  • You can say there is two sides to every stories but in this case you can say three. No, the ATVs are not everyday after school or during the week. But yes we do let our kids and family ride the ATVs in our yard and the families yard behind us. We also ride them too.

    I, September Tingle, took a petition around our neighborhood with the help of Donna Samples to ask our neighbors if they had problems with us riding our ATVs in our yards. If they did not have a problem with it, could they sign the paper. Out of 30 houses only seven did not sign. So what does that tell you?

  • How much do you think you really know about Henry County?

    Leadership programs throughout the state have risen in popularity in the last ten years, and I’ve had the opportunity to go through two of them.

    In each, participants attend a series of themed days over the course of several months to learn about the various aspects of their county — its industry, schools, agriculture, government, human services and more.

  • I wanted to take this opportunity to thank the Girl Scouts and Boy Scouts for their generosity in painting the playground equipment at our school for their community project. They, along with their parents, spent many hours on weekends and after school to paint swings, monkey bars, etc… beautiful vibrant colors. “Wow! Who did this? Our playground looks beautiful!” was the reaction by students and staff alike. We are fortunate to serve a community that supports our school. Our students are learning life lessons of the importance of giving back to the community.