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Opinion

  • This year marks the bicentennial of the birth of Abraham Lincoln.  Born on February 12, 1809 in Hardin County, he led a modest life, worked hard, and went on to become the 16th President of the United States.  Abraham Lincoln won the presidency in 1860 as the candidate of the newly formed Republican Party.  He led our nation through one of the most devastating periods in our history - the Civil War.  He is considered by many to have been the greatest American president. 

  • Spring has arrived, and I’m pretty happy about that — except for one thing.

    Spring, as you know, is when most livestock give birth. Each year we have mares that are bred to foal in March, April or May, and that makes me extremely nervous. Being a stay-at-home wife, I am the designated lookout. Somehow it is my job to keep an eye on the mares and make sure that everything is going okay, should they foal.

  • We the members of the Henry County Concerned Citizens would like to advise all Henry County Residents of how our lawsuit regarding mandatory garbage is progressing.

    There will be a scheduled hearing at 9:45 a.m., April 28, on the 10th floor of the Jefferson County Judicial Center at 700 W. Jefferson Street.  The Appellate Court will hear oral arguments at this time.  The court of appeals will hear only about 20 percent of cases put before them.

  • Well this is that time of year again- spring, cookouts, horse racing, etc. Not only is it one of these three things but one big thing that bothers me day after day. This is a subject I have written about in the past and hasn’t really changed at all. It is the continued speeding in our subdivision. This has angered me more as the weather began to change and more when nothing is being done about it either. I realize and have been told that speed bumps are not an option right now due to potential to build houses in our neighbor subdivision, Arbor View.

  • On Feb.

  • Since 2004, thousands of children in the District of Columbia have had scholarships worth up to $7,500 to attend a private school of their choice as part of the DC Opportunity Scholarship program. Currently, more than 1,700 low income children are benefiting from this opportunity. Unfortunately, language in the current $410 billion spending bill, which was signed by President Obama, eliminated the scholarship program.

  • Guest Commentary

    In 2008, the Second Wind Dreams published a letter of thanks to those individuals who made possible a wish granted to the residents of Homestead Nursing Home in New Castle. Once again, we want to continue the list and the dream, and the ones who granted those wishes.

  • The Hussey Copper Relay For Life team hosted a dance on Feb. 28 at the Eminence Community Center. The band, Leo and the Moonlighters played from 7 to 11 p.m. The community came out and supported a wonderful benefit. This was our first big event this year and I think everyone enjoyed themselves and we enjoyed everyone being there.

  • In the present economy, why are homeowners being taxed more while property values have gone down? According to the latest news reports, property in the U.S. has declined 27 percent. Henry County is no different than the rest of the United States. Is this another example of the rich getting richer and the poor getting poorer?

  • Back in the 1960s, tattoos were not the popular body art that they have become. In the upstate New York town where I grew up, I knew of no one who had a tattoo; that is, until my boyfriend – now my husband – got one in the Marines. I was shocked. How could he mar his body with something so permanent? He thought my efforts to persuade him to have it removed were nuts. The tattoo stayed, I got used to it and married him in spite of the large off-kilter anchor on one arm.

  • Roads and NASCAR were the twin highlights of a busy time in the Kentucky House of Representatives last week, as we raced toward the final few days of the 2009 Regular Session.

  • Speed bumps are a traffic control device that is specifically regulated by statute. There are many illegal speed bumps within the city of Eminence. The city officials know they are illegal. The city attorney knows they are improperly installed. they are there because the “people wanted them,” just as in Pleasureville. The city attorney for these two towns (the same person) should make the city officials aware of the statutes and ensure that the cities comply with what is legal.

    Ron Marlow

    Eminence

     

  • While the rest of America is tightening family budgets and making sacrifices due to the recession, Washington, D.C.

  • An important birthday passed Monday, and I’d be remiss if I didn’t say a little something about it.

    Theodore “Dr. Seuss” Geisel would have been 105 on March 2. Geisel’s impact has been felt across generations now, instilling a love of reading into countless children — and I count myself among those.

  • Although final details are still pending, Kentucky got a much clearer picture last week of what it can expect from the federal stimulus package that Congress recently passed.  Even with quite a few strings attached, it should still provide a substantial lift right when we need it most.

    According to Governor Beshear, we will get a little more than $3 billion over the next 28 months, which doesn’t include direct stimulus payments Kentuckians may receive from such things as tax cuts or boosts in Social Security payments.

  • I know most insurance companies are reliable and that sometimes a reasonable increase in insurance premiums is justified. I don’t like it when it happens, but I understand that it can happen. Even the most reasonable person would agree, however, that three increases over a six-year period, cumulatively totaling more than a 100 percent hike in premiums, would be unjustified, harmful and unconscionable.

  • Last year, families, businesses and communities in Kentucky’s Fourth District were forced to make tough choices in order to afford the soaring cost of energy.  This painful experience taught us that our energy supply will not always be abundant, reliable or affordable.  While it is tempting to think our energy crisis has ended now that oil prices have dropped, Americans cannot afford for Congress to become complacent.  We must not abandon our goal of creating a new American energy strategy.

  • Beginning tomorrow, Thursday, Feb. 26, the Henry County Local will no longer be located at 1378 Eminence Road.

    Instead, we’ll be operating out of our new location at 18 S. Penn Avenue in Eminence, next door to Shroyer Insurance and a couple doors down from Chat ‘N Nibble.

    Though we’ve allotted two days for the move, we should be up and running again Friday morning. But our first ‘official’ day of business at our new home will be Monday, March 2.

  • Plans are currently underway for the 27th Annual New Castle Spring Fling.  The date is Saturday, June 13.  The committee is currently working on several things for the 27th Annual New Castle Spring Fling, but the economic crisis has hit us hard and we are strapped for funds to run the festivals in New Castle. The festivals are the Spring Fling, Fall Fling, and Christmas in New Castle.  We need some donors to step up and sponsor our festivals.  If we don’t get more sponsorships, we might have to take drastic cuts in the festivals.   It would be v

  • On the prairies of eastern Kansas, the early spring is when ranchers do their annual burning to allow the new spring grass to emerge with full vigor. I used to love to watch the flickering horizon on the prairie from my front porch. But every once in awhile, the Kansas winds would pick up or shift direction so that those “controlled” fires became a potential menace.