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Opinion

  • Over the next few weeks, the House of Representatives will dedicate significant energy to debating a proposal that will increase utility bills, raise the price of a gallon of gas, push food prices to new heights and generally increase the cost of nearly every consumer product in an attempt to hastily address the issue of global climate change. 

  • In the 50 years since the federal government began tracking personal income growth, there has never been a three-month period that was lower than its counterpart from the previous year.

    This summer, however, that’s expected to change.

  • In 1992, the average cost of a gallon of gas was $1.05. Remember that?

    In 1992, the average cost of a new car was $16,950. The cost of a first class stamp was just 29-cents.

    And in 1992, the Local started out costing 35-cents, and didn’t yet have full color on any page.

    Since then, a lot about the Local has changed. And next week, you’ll notice a change we haven’t made in 17 years.

    For the first time since September 1992, the price of the Local will go up a quarter to 75-cents. That change takes effect next week.

  • The Henry County CARE Team’s Celebration Kids committee would like to thank this great community for helping to make our annual Celebration Kids event a huge success. 

    In this time of economic uncertainty, we had anticipated having our work cut out for us, but we were pleasantly surprised by the very generous outpouring of support from local businesses, schools, agencies, churches and individuals who came through with the needed donations.

  • With Memorial Day in sight, and summer vacations on the horizon, now is the ideal time to celebrate what Governor Beshear has declared Travel and Tourism Week.

  • I look forward to Thursday mornings. This is the day I baby-sit my daughter’s two youngest children while she takes the three older girls to a home-schooling co-op at their church. For five hours I watch over Burt, age four and a half, and Mary, two. This is fun and interesting.

  • The Judy Lea Memorial Henry County Children’s Fund committee would like to thank all who helped make this year’s benefit a success.  Our 23rd benefit for the children of Henry County raised more than $15,000.

  • A little less than a year from now, our state will celebrate the 20th anniversary of the Kentucky Education Reform Act, widely considered to be one of the most important laws ever adopted by the General Assembly.

    The legislation filled more than 900 pages, and within them were about 30 distinct ideas that, like the inner workings of a clock, depended on each other for reform to work.

    It was a bold step at the time, but an array of national studies since then has repeatedly shown that our students have made significant strides in less than a generation.

  • This is the time of the year when cold Arctic air frequently meets warm Gulf air thereby spawning the tornados that plague the Midwest. Kentucky gets its share, which concerns me. Growing up in New York, there just weren’t any tornados. The Wizard of Oz afforded the sum total of my knowledge about those swirling winds and I was quite impressed at an early age by their capacity for destruction. Since then, I lived in Kansas long enough to gain serious firsthand knowledge.

  • In these challenging times, it is more important than ever to understand and monitor our family budgets and personal finances.  Americans are facing a lot of uncertainty these days, so it is vital to educate yourself on the best ways to save and protect your finances for the future.  Since April is Financial Literacy Month, I wanted to share some tools that will help individuals and families better manage personal finances, assist those who may be having trouble with mortgage, and protect against identity theft and scammers.

  • To better understand just how much the country’s economic crisis has affected Kentucky, it may help to look at some hard-to-imagine statistics in a different way.

    If the number of people seeking unemployment insurance for the first time in February came together, for example, they would immediately become Kentucky’s third-largest city, slightly ahead of Owensboro.

    The total number of unemployed is of course much higher.  Its size easily outranks the combined populations of Owensboro, Bowling Green, Covington and Richmond.

  • General Manager

    It’s an exciting time here at the Local. After weeks of settling in, we’re finally ready to show off our new home!

    We invite you to visit our new office at 18 South Penn Avenue, in Eminence, this Thursday from 1 to 6 p.m.

    Stop by, meet the staff and see just what it is we’re so excited about!

    The new office, undoubtedly isn’t the only change you’ve noticed for the Local.

  • Underage drinking is a serious problem, with roots deep in our culture. Teens are in a constant state of searching for who they are and who they want to become. They have a desire for adventure and excitement as well as a desire to feel more grown up. Unfortunately, many teens turn to alcohol to fill this need for enlightenment, exhilaration and maturity. These reasons are often compounded by their belief that they are indestructible.

  • Years from now, when we look back on Kentucky’s growing role in helping the country become more energy independent, the first few months of this year will undoubtedly be considered a pivotal time.

  • As a motorcycle rider, I have to be constantly on guard for road hazards that can cause me to lose control of my bike. Small things like loose gravel or animals darting across the road are perilous for a biker.

  • Geoff Davis

    U.S. Representative

    On April 2, Speaker Nancy Pelosi succeeded in passing her federal budget that outlines more than $3.5 trillion in spending for fiscal year 2010.  The non-partisan Congressional Budget Office projected a $1.8 trillion deficit for the current fiscal year, and that does not include the stimulus bill that will cost Americans more than $1 trillion, which was signed into law by the President on Feb. 1.  As of April 7, the U.S. national debt stands at more than $11 trillion.

  • Let me preface by saying that I’m in no way judgmental or sexist here. My honest stance has always been “live and let live.” I’m simply being observant.

  • April has again been recognized as Donate Life Month nationally and here in Kentucky. I felt that this is a good time to thank the many Countians who have supported organ and tissue donation at our drivers license counter by donating $1 in support of our Kentucky Circuit Court Clerks Trust For Life and by placing their name on the new Kentucky Organ Donor Registry.

  • Back in February, when Congress passed and President Obama signed into law the federal stimulus package for the states, the only thing we knew for sure was that a significant amount of money was about to come our way.

    It could not have come at a better time.  Economists predict the states are looking at a combined deficit of $250 billion between now and 2011, and in Kentucky, we have already cut nearly $900 million since Governor Beshear took office.  There is growing evidence that a significant deficit is likely during the next fiscal year as well.

  • Every day, Kentuckians tell me about the sacrifices they are being forced to make during these difficult economic times.  Across the Fourth District, families are monitoring their spending more carefully and weeding out unnecessary expenses to streamline their budgets.  It is unacceptable that Washington is not exercising the same kind of common sense as people throughout our Commonwealth.