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Opinion

  • Memorial Day is a day set aside for us as Americans to remember those who have fought and died for our country and I would like to thank all the men and women who have fought and died for our country, and I would like to thank all the men and women who have given the ultimate sacrifice for our country over the years.

  • People the world over are governed by rules and regulations – far too many in my humble opinion. The ones that irk me the most are those aimed at protecting us from our own actions – like the mandatory seatbelt law, or, in many states, the mandatory helmet law for motorcyclists. I know, I know – many of these laws save lives. But I believe folks ought to have the right to act unwisely in matters affecting only themselves. The Bill of Rights should have had a clause to the affect that people have the right to be dumb about their own welfare if they choose.

  • I recently saw where the HCHS senior prom and the EHS prom were held in Louisville. My question is why couldn’t the proms be held at their respective high school gyms?

    When I went to school, the high school gym was a suitable place for the senior prom, but it seems the grown ups are sending the seniors the wrong message by saying that the seniors are better than the seniors who came before them like myself.

    I hope everyone will come to their senses and start holding the senior proms at the high school gyms again.

  • While there are still a few reports of the H1N1 (or swine) flu being diagnosed across the state, it is looking more and more likely that our fears of a more serious outbreak will thankfully not come to pass.

    But that, of course, does not mean we need to let our guard down.

    Fortunately, that is even less likely to happen after the recent announcement by the University of Louisville that it has received a $2.3 million federal grant to help communities prepare for any possible large-scale public health outbreaks.

  • Recently this nation celebrated Memorial Day, a day set aside to honor those people who served in our military to fight our wars and to protect our families. Some served and returned home to family, others died and were buried on foreign soils because they believed in serving our country to protect the freedoms that their forefathers had fought and won on our behalf. The Gettysburg Address was probably the first public speech to honor those who fought in the civil war.

  • When he first came into our office, Bob McGee told me about Molly with a tear in his eye.

    His faithful companion, with whom he walked nearly every day for as long as they were friends, had died.

    McGee and Molly had a long relationship of master and loyal pooch. I understood the tears in his eyes.

    Over the years I’ve had countless dogs —and cats — and seen them come and go. Koko the German Shepherd mix was one of my best friends when I was a child.

  • Whenever the General Assembly wants to take a more in-depth look at an issue affecting Kentucky, it often turns to its Program Review and Investigations Committee.

    The subjects it covers are as wide ranging as state government.  Two of its most recent reports, for example, dealt with re-entry programs for felons completing their prison sentence and the cost of college and high school textbooks.

  • My daughter and her husband recently brought home a tiny black puppy for their five children. All the kids immediately began fawning over him except Ellie, age 6, who harbors a desperate fear that he might bite her. She leaps onto a chair or to the top of the couch whenever he’s around. While this reaction may sound reasonable, the truth is that this little creature weighs all of six pounds. The other morning I watched from a distance as she slowly and cautiously stretched out her little arm from the top of a riding toy to try petting him as he dashed around.

  • Postmaster, New Castle

    You probably know that the Postal Service is big. To be able to serve the mailing needs of every American every business day, we have to be big! But we bet you didn’t know that:

  • Henry County’s Reigning Biggest Loser

     

    “Matter cannot be created or destroyed.” As a seventh-eighth grade science teacher I know that this is true. If you exercise to burn off more calories than you consume, you have to lose weight. As the reigning Biggest Loser of Henry County, I challenge Henry County Local readers to join the next Biggest Loser Contest.  

     

  • This summer, I am encouraging Fourth District residents to join me in exercising more often.  As you may know, obesity can cause numerous complications to your health.  In Kentucky, more than twenty-seven percent of the population is obese.  However, by becoming more physically active, we can reverse this dangerous trend and put ourselves on the right track to a healthier future.  

  • In any given year, a little more than 10 percent of our country’s population packs up its belongings and moves.  Most don’t go far: Two-thirds just re-locate to another area in the same county, and another fifth stay in the same state.

    In today’s economy, however, even our restless nature is taking a break.  The U.S. Census Bureau confirmed that last month, when it reported our country’s moving rate in 2008 was the lowest since the agency began tracking it in 1948.

  • Over the next few weeks, the House of Representatives will dedicate significant energy to debating a proposal that will increase utility bills, raise the price of a gallon of gas, push food prices to new heights and generally increase the cost of nearly every consumer product in an attempt to hastily address the issue of global climate change. 

  • In the 50 years since the federal government began tracking personal income growth, there has never been a three-month period that was lower than its counterpart from the previous year.

    This summer, however, that’s expected to change.

  • In 1992, the average cost of a gallon of gas was $1.05. Remember that?

    In 1992, the average cost of a new car was $16,950. The cost of a first class stamp was just 29-cents.

    And in 1992, the Local started out costing 35-cents, and didn’t yet have full color on any page.

    Since then, a lot about the Local has changed. And next week, you’ll notice a change we haven’t made in 17 years.

    For the first time since September 1992, the price of the Local will go up a quarter to 75-cents. That change takes effect next week.

  • The Henry County CARE Team’s Celebration Kids committee would like to thank this great community for helping to make our annual Celebration Kids event a huge success. 

    In this time of economic uncertainty, we had anticipated having our work cut out for us, but we were pleasantly surprised by the very generous outpouring of support from local businesses, schools, agencies, churches and individuals who came through with the needed donations.

  • With Memorial Day in sight, and summer vacations on the horizon, now is the ideal time to celebrate what Governor Beshear has declared Travel and Tourism Week.

  • I look forward to Thursday mornings. This is the day I baby-sit my daughter’s two youngest children while she takes the three older girls to a home-schooling co-op at their church. For five hours I watch over Burt, age four and a half, and Mary, two. This is fun and interesting.

  • The Judy Lea Memorial Henry County Children’s Fund committee would like to thank all who helped make this year’s benefit a success.  Our 23rd benefit for the children of Henry County raised more than $15,000.

  • A little less than a year from now, our state will celebrate the 20th anniversary of the Kentucky Education Reform Act, widely considered to be one of the most important laws ever adopted by the General Assembly.

    The legislation filled more than 900 pages, and within them were about 30 distinct ideas that, like the inner workings of a clock, depended on each other for reform to work.

    It was a bold step at the time, but an array of national studies since then has repeatedly shown that our students have made significant strides in less than a generation.