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Opinion

  • Back in February, when Congress passed and President Obama signed into law the federal stimulus package for the states, the only thing we knew for sure was that a significant amount of money was about to come our way.

    It could not have come at a better time.  Economists predict the states are looking at a combined deficit of $250 billion between now and 2011, and in Kentucky, we have already cut nearly $900 million since Governor Beshear took office.  There is growing evidence that a significant deficit is likely during the next fiscal year as well.

  • Every day, Kentuckians tell me about the sacrifices they are being forced to make during these difficult economic times.  Across the Fourth District, families are monitoring their spending more carefully and weeding out unnecessary expenses to streamline their budgets.  It is unacceptable that Washington is not exercising the same kind of common sense as people throughout our Commonwealth.

  • At Henry County High School it’s senior project time and throughout their senior year students had to pick a mentor to work with them.  I wanted to take the time to acknowledge a wonderful woman in this county who gave of her time, her talent and wisdom when she didn’t have to. Most of you may know her as she is involved in lots of different clubs and activities here at home. Her name is Malissa Beatty.  She really is a hometown hero.  She is a local artist here in town and an outstanding member of our small community.

  • April is a very special month at OVEC Head Start and Early Head Start!

    Since the 1970s, April has been recognized as Child Abuse Prevention Month. Blue ribbons, the national symbol for child abuse and neglect awareness, can be seen almost everywhere — tied to car antennas, street lamps, business doors and pinned on the shirts of people who care about children and families.

  • It’s a scary time in newspaperland lately.

    Just a few weeks ago, a paper I’ve long respected — The Rocky Mountain News — closed its doors and shut down production after almost 150 years of continuous printing.

    Other newspapers have fallen by the wayside in a dazzling, and frightening display in recent months.

  • The General Assembly finished its legislative session late last week, ending nearly three months of work that will have a positive impact for years to come.

    Highlights range from a plan to overcome a large budget deficit to significantly revising the tests that determine how well our schools are progressing.  We covered a lot of ground in a short amount of time, especially when considering that this was a “short” session – so named because it is half as long as those in even-numbered years.

  • In these difficult economic times, more Americans are turning to non-profit and charity organizations for assistance.  From local soup kitchens and homeless shelters to major philanthropic organizations, like the Red Cross and Goodwill Industries, charities across the nation are reporting an overwhelming increase in demand for their services.  However, due to a short-sighted provision included in President Barack Obama’s budget blueprint for fiscal year 2010, some charities may be unable to continue to respond to the needs of our communities.

  • The U.S. Labor Department recently released the unemployment numbers for February. More than 650,000 jobs were lost last month, pushing the national unemployment rate to 8.1 percent, up from 7.6 percent in January.  

    Since the recession began in December 2007, 4.4 million jobs have been cut. February’s report further underscores the importance of creating and protecting American jobs.  

    It is through this framework that we must examine President Barack Obama’s budget blueprint for fiscal year 2010.

  • The 2009 Regular Session – which wraps up on Friday this week – will long be remembered for several reasons.  During this time we overcame a large budget deficit, overhauled the state testing system for our schools and set in motion nearly $2 billion in road improvements.  We also sought to slow our skyrocketing prison growth by providing more substance-abuse treatment to those whose addiction has led to an arrest.

    There were quite a few other bills about to become law, though, that in ways large and small will make a difference in our lives.

  • This year marks the bicentennial of the birth of Abraham Lincoln.  Born on February 12, 1809 in Hardin County, he led a modest life, worked hard, and went on to become the 16th President of the United States.  Abraham Lincoln won the presidency in 1860 as the candidate of the newly formed Republican Party.  He led our nation through one of the most devastating periods in our history - the Civil War.  He is considered by many to have been the greatest American president. 

  • Spring has arrived, and I’m pretty happy about that — except for one thing.

    Spring, as you know, is when most livestock give birth. Each year we have mares that are bred to foal in March, April or May, and that makes me extremely nervous. Being a stay-at-home wife, I am the designated lookout. Somehow it is my job to keep an eye on the mares and make sure that everything is going okay, should they foal.

  • We the members of the Henry County Concerned Citizens would like to advise all Henry County Residents of how our lawsuit regarding mandatory garbage is progressing.

    There will be a scheduled hearing at 9:45 a.m., April 28, on the 10th floor of the Jefferson County Judicial Center at 700 W. Jefferson Street.  The Appellate Court will hear oral arguments at this time.  The court of appeals will hear only about 20 percent of cases put before them.

  • Well this is that time of year again- spring, cookouts, horse racing, etc. Not only is it one of these three things but one big thing that bothers me day after day. This is a subject I have written about in the past and hasn’t really changed at all. It is the continued speeding in our subdivision. This has angered me more as the weather began to change and more when nothing is being done about it either. I realize and have been told that speed bumps are not an option right now due to potential to build houses in our neighbor subdivision, Arbor View.

  • On Feb.

  • Since 2004, thousands of children in the District of Columbia have had scholarships worth up to $7,500 to attend a private school of their choice as part of the DC Opportunity Scholarship program. Currently, more than 1,700 low income children are benefiting from this opportunity. Unfortunately, language in the current $410 billion spending bill, which was signed by President Obama, eliminated the scholarship program.

  • Guest Commentary

    In 2008, the Second Wind Dreams published a letter of thanks to those individuals who made possible a wish granted to the residents of Homestead Nursing Home in New Castle. Once again, we want to continue the list and the dream, and the ones who granted those wishes.

  • The Hussey Copper Relay For Life team hosted a dance on Feb. 28 at the Eminence Community Center. The band, Leo and the Moonlighters played from 7 to 11 p.m. The community came out and supported a wonderful benefit. This was our first big event this year and I think everyone enjoyed themselves and we enjoyed everyone being there.

  • In the present economy, why are homeowners being taxed more while property values have gone down? According to the latest news reports, property in the U.S. has declined 27 percent. Henry County is no different than the rest of the United States. Is this another example of the rich getting richer and the poor getting poorer?

  • Back in the 1960s, tattoos were not the popular body art that they have become. In the upstate New York town where I grew up, I knew of no one who had a tattoo; that is, until my boyfriend – now my husband – got one in the Marines. I was shocked. How could he mar his body with something so permanent? He thought my efforts to persuade him to have it removed were nuts. The tattoo stayed, I got used to it and married him in spite of the large off-kilter anchor on one arm.

  • Roads and NASCAR were the twin highlights of a busy time in the Kentucky House of Representatives last week, as we raced toward the final few days of the 2009 Regular Session.