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Opinion

  • Speed bumps are a traffic control device that is specifically regulated by statute. There are many illegal speed bumps within the city of Eminence. The city officials know they are illegal. The city attorney knows they are improperly installed. they are there because the “people wanted them,” just as in Pleasureville. The city attorney for these two towns (the same person) should make the city officials aware of the statutes and ensure that the cities comply with what is legal.

    Ron Marlow

    Eminence

     

  • While the rest of America is tightening family budgets and making sacrifices due to the recession, Washington, D.C.

  • An important birthday passed Monday, and I’d be remiss if I didn’t say a little something about it.

    Theodore “Dr. Seuss” Geisel would have been 105 on March 2. Geisel’s impact has been felt across generations now, instilling a love of reading into countless children — and I count myself among those.

  • Although final details are still pending, Kentucky got a much clearer picture last week of what it can expect from the federal stimulus package that Congress recently passed.  Even with quite a few strings attached, it should still provide a substantial lift right when we need it most.

    According to Governor Beshear, we will get a little more than $3 billion over the next 28 months, which doesn’t include direct stimulus payments Kentuckians may receive from such things as tax cuts or boosts in Social Security payments.

  • I know most insurance companies are reliable and that sometimes a reasonable increase in insurance premiums is justified. I don’t like it when it happens, but I understand that it can happen. Even the most reasonable person would agree, however, that three increases over a six-year period, cumulatively totaling more than a 100 percent hike in premiums, would be unjustified, harmful and unconscionable.

  • Last year, families, businesses and communities in Kentucky’s Fourth District were forced to make tough choices in order to afford the soaring cost of energy.  This painful experience taught us that our energy supply will not always be abundant, reliable or affordable.  While it is tempting to think our energy crisis has ended now that oil prices have dropped, Americans cannot afford for Congress to become complacent.  We must not abandon our goal of creating a new American energy strategy.

  • Beginning tomorrow, Thursday, Feb. 26, the Henry County Local will no longer be located at 1378 Eminence Road.

    Instead, we’ll be operating out of our new location at 18 S. Penn Avenue in Eminence, next door to Shroyer Insurance and a couple doors down from Chat ‘N Nibble.

    Though we’ve allotted two days for the move, we should be up and running again Friday morning. But our first ‘official’ day of business at our new home will be Monday, March 2.

  • Plans are currently underway for the 27th Annual New Castle Spring Fling.  The date is Saturday, June 13.  The committee is currently working on several things for the 27th Annual New Castle Spring Fling, but the economic crisis has hit us hard and we are strapped for funds to run the festivals in New Castle. The festivals are the Spring Fling, Fall Fling, and Christmas in New Castle.  We need some donors to step up and sponsor our festivals.  If we don’t get more sponsorships, we might have to take drastic cuts in the festivals.   It would be v

  • On the prairies of eastern Kansas, the early spring is when ranchers do their annual burning to allow the new spring grass to emerge with full vigor. I used to love to watch the flickering horizon on the prairie from my front porch. But every once in awhile, the Kansas winds would pick up or shift direction so that those “controlled” fires became a potential menace.

     

  • I would like to thank Scriber Station and an awesome Sunday School group at Eminence Baptist Church for donating a meal for 20 of our seniors once a month and Eminence Christian Church for donating a meal once every 3 months. This means a lot to our Meals on Wheels program.

    I want to reiterate that these donations along with any monetary donations will keep this program running. We need your help to continue to provide meals for the seniors in this community.

  • Thanks to the Henry County Local for reporting on a very important issue pertaining to our county politics in last week’s paper. As reported, it appears the momentum of the 2010 election has started and many Henry County residents and Kentucky state representatives have taken an interest in the future of Henry County and it’s political status.   Last meeting, Secretary of State, Trey Grayson provided information and direction at the last Henry County Republican monthly meeting.

  • The first priority of elected officials at any level of government is making sure that they truly listen to those they serve.

    With that in mind, I sent out a 17-question survey before the start of the 2009 Regular Session to gauge the views of several hundred households located in our legislative district.  The results, as I expected, were enlightening.

  • When Governor Beshear took office in December 2007, he joked that he knew the cupboard would be bare, but that he didn’t expect it to be gone.

    Since then, he has overseen more than $430 million worth of cuts, all without touching Medicaid and our classrooms.  Unfortunately, with the nation’s economy showing no signs of improvement, he and the General Assembly learned in November that this would not be enough.  Our state economists told us that another $456 million would still need to be trimmed by the end of June.

  • On behalf of the Eminence Education Foundation and the Eminence Independent School District, I would like to take this opportunity to express my gratitude for making our Education Dinner and Silent Auction such a success.  The Foundation collected approximately $9,000 to use for future scholarships and teachers’ grants.

  • When Eminence High School English teacher, Cara Puckett, offered me the opportunity to be a guest judge for her students’ Poetry Out Loud competition, I eagerly accepted.

    I like poetry, I like teenagers, how hard could it be?

    Then I checked out the Poetry Out Loud National Recitation Project website and started to appreciate the complexities.

    Participants were to choose two poems from a list of thousands spanning hundreds of years and representing all the different types of poetry.

  • Our Governor is calling it the most widespread natural disaster in our state’s history.  This was my second widespread natural disaster since taking office.   In the case of the tornadoes of 2004 and this recent ice storm, I have been extremely proud of the caring and resourceful people of this county.  At this time I would like to thank a few of those who pitched in to make the best out of the recent event.

  • On Feb. 3, the snow caused considerable headaches for many motorists. The timing of the snow and more of it than was forecast caused many parents to have concerns about the safety of their children while traveling home from school. I, like every employee of the Henry County Public Schools, make the safety of our children my number one priority each and every day. It gives me great comfort to know that the transportation staff performs their duties with a great amount of professionalism.

  • The recent power outage made me realize that perhaps my self-image has always been slightly askew. All my life, I have fancied myself the “pioneer” type; delighting in the sight of my baby’s freshly washed diapers flapping in the Kansas breeze, making jam out of the wild blackberries I picked myself on our farm, knitting cotton dishrags for the kitchen, and helping haul water when we still depended on a cistern.  I have always felt the simple life was for me, as if I could step into the pages of a Laura Ingalls Wilder book and feel completely at home.

  • On behalf of the City of Eminence, I would like to thank the many, many volunteers who gave of their time to assist the citizens of Eminence and Henry County during the recent snow and ice storm emergencies.   The list is so long that I cannot mention everyone by name, but you know who you are.  I am so proud to live in a community where people care so much for one another.

  • I am a senior at Henry County High School, and I’m writing to bring awareness about the importance of pet owners getting their pets spayed or neutered.  Spaying and neutering a pet can make animals calmer and some animals feel less of an urge to run away from their home.  Pets that have had the procedure done can no longer reproduce, so spaying or neutering your pet can help control the pet population.  Needless to say, there will be no unwanted animals roaming the streets going hungry.