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Opinion

  • On behalf of the officers and employees of PBI Bank, I would like to take this opportunity to thank everyone who contributed to our 16th annual Christmas party at Eastern Elementtary. With your generous contributions, we were able to provide toys, goodie bags, a pizza party and Santa Claus for 77 children who otherwise might not have had the Merry Christmas that every child deserves.

    Again, many, many thanks to our wonderful friends and customers who contribute faithfully each year so that these children are blessed. We wish you a very happy new year!

  • en almost a week old at the time, but from a legislative viewpoint, it didn’t really begin until early last week, when all 100 members of the Kentucky House of Representatives and half of the state Senate were officially sworn into office.

    Within a few hours, legislators from both parties in both chambers began meeting to elect their leaders, and by the evening, a new one for the House was chosen: Rep. Greg Stumbo, who officially became House Speaker on Wednesday when he was approved without a dissenting vote.

  • Thanks to the trust of the people of Kentucky, I’ve received the privilege of another term in the U.S. Senate. That’s an extraordinary gift from the voters, and I’m grateful to have the next six years to serve our Commonwealth and our country.

    As a new Congress and a new presidential administration begin, I look for lessons from great Kentuckians who have served our state in public office in the past. One who stands out is Wendell Ford.

  • When I was growing up in the 1950s on an upstate New York farm, a henhouse full of chickens supplied our family with eggs.  Still vivid in my memory are the special mailing cartons my mother used to send farm-fresh eggs 150 miles south to friends near New York City, perhaps because I was always amazed – and still am – that the eggs did not break en route.

  • This month, Americans will welcome a new Congress and a new President to Washington, D.C.  The 111th Congress and President Barack Obama will soon begin working on pragmatic solutions for our nation’s future.  Now more than ever, we must collaborate in a bipartisan manner to enact legislation that will have a lasting positive impact on our country and its citizens.

  • At this time of the year our thoughts turn toward gifts and giving. However, there is no greater gift than the gift of hope. In our community there was someone who lost their job months ago. With no income and no immediate family, they in turn lost their electric, their water and relying on wood for heat, they were down to just seven sticks of firewood.

  • New Year’s Eve has never meant a huge celebration for my husband and me.

    We were married on Dec. 28, and our second daughter was born Dec. 27. Between those occasions and Christmas, we have never been much in the mood to party on New Year’s Eve. Still, for about 20 years when I was younger, I eagerly looked forward to Dec. 31, more than any other holiday.

  • General Manager

    I’m terrible at keeping resolutions. But then, I imagine that most people are.

    Like many people, I’ve made a variety of New Year’s resolutions over the years. They’ve ranged from the standard resolutions to exercise more and lose weight to trying to get the dishes done at the end of each day.

    I came close to making it this year — I somewhat silently resolved to exercise more. A couple of weeks later, I took the first step toward that and bought a mini-stair stepping machine.

  • December may be the mid-point of the school year, but for our public schools, colleges and universities, this particular month happens to be the start of a new era.

    First, the Kentucky Council on Postsecondary Education chose as its new president someone who spent the first half of this decade running the largest higher education system in the country: the State University of New York. Second, the Department of Education’s commissioner announced he would be stepping down soon due to health reasons.

  • As we gather with friends and family to celebrate the holidays, I hope you will take a moment to reflect upon the joy and blessings in our lives.  We are fortunate each day to enjoy the freedom, equality and justice that make the United States the greatest country in the world.

  • I would like to start off by thanking everyone who attended the annual Christmas in New Castle on Friday, Dec 5.  I would like to thank all the parade participants, City of New Castle employees, New Castle Police Department, New Castle Fire Department, Prewitt’s Funeral Home, Henry County Judge Exec Office, New Castle Renaissance Committee, Joe Berry, Homer Druin, Merrie Melodious Dulcimers, Morris Insurance Agency, Kentucky State Police Trooper Chip Perry, My Cottage Web Studio, Froggy 104.9, WHAS TV 11, New Castle Festival Committee members with their help in having anothe

  • Early this year, Kentucky got a sobering wake-up call when the Pew Center on the States said we had the nation’s fastest-growing prison population in 2007.  While most states saw their numbers rise by less than five percent from the previous year, ours went up 12 percent.

  • I could not believe it when I flipped the Henry County Local paper over and read the bold headline about the unfortunate death of a local businessman and friend.

  • I fully understand that the business of journalism relies on sensationalist headlines and scandal. But I’d like to take this small space to remind you of where it is you are trying to do business. Henry County is a (sometimes unfortunately) place where most people know the story long before this paper is printed. For you, it is sometimes difficult to realize your place here, but it was no more apparent than when I read your article concerning Michael Wells on the front page of the Dec. 17 paper.

  • Well, here we go again…a new year…a fresh start with more good intentions and the pledge to spend more time with the family, begin healthier habits, get organized or begin that “read the Bible in a year program.” Don’t worry, this is not another one of those motivational columns that promises to help you reach all those lofty goals you have set for yourself. This is, however, a column written by your community anti-drug coalition that is dedicated to strengthening the families of Henry County.

  • For several years now, I’ve had the distinct pleasure of helping type Santa letters.

    And I don’t say that tongue in cheek — I do enjoy them. Though some can be hard to read, and typing the letters exactly as the children have written them can be tough, more often than not they are entertaining and in some cases quite touching.

    Several years ago, I remember when the Pokeman craze hit — there were about as many spelling options for Pokeman as you can imagine — and none of them quite right.

  • It was with dismay that this week’s Local had a front page headline about the death of a Henry County man. Death anytime is so sad, but at this time of year, it is worse. The family will never celebrate another Christmas season without remembering the loss of that loved one, and it will be a bittersweet memory for them.

  • In December of 1970 when our first child was a baby, my husband and I lived in a tiny house overlooking miles of prairie near Auburn, Kansas. Given my fascination with pioneers, I decided that, like Kansans of long ago, we should use a tumbleweed for a Christmas tree. I was excited to relive this tradition, and so we bundled up our baby and hiked onto a pasture in search of a suitable tumbleweed from among the many that piled up on the barbed wire fences along the north side.

  • Need information

    I am writing in hopes that someone in the county can help me locate some information.  I am looking for any information on a Charles Dorman Powell.

    He married an Ann Coghill of New Castle in the mid to late 1940s.  I know he had a sister by the name of Barbara and one, maybe two brothers.  I am also looking for any information on a William or Albert Rudd that lived/owned farms on Fallen Timber Road in the 50’s.

  • Bethlehem Postmaster

    In this fast paced, hurry up and get it done kind of world we live in, you can do just about anything without having to acknowledge another human being. Humor me, if you will, as I demonstrate a typical scenario: