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Opinion

  • My name is Richard Thomas. I am a member of the Eminence City Council. I want the residents to know that on Sept. 8, I officially withdrew my name as candidate for reelection to Eminence City Council.

    When I took office, I told the residents that I would do the best job for them that I could. But when I stood up for what is right, I was voted down 5-1, often. Numerous threats have been made against me. I took my concerns to several government agencies, including the FBI. Only time will tell what will happen.

  • When school is called off, everyone knows before their first cup of coffee.

    As a customer of the Henry County Water District, I am upset with the way the recent water outage was handled. I completely understand the problems that can arise when dealing with broken infrastructure in a large area. I can even maintain patience when those problems cause me to conserve water over a long period of time. However, I am outraged at the lack of communication the water district had, not only to me, but also to the children of our community.

  • I’m sure most of us will remember where we were when hurricane force winds ripped through the midwest, knocking out power for hundreds of thousands, just in our little neck of the woods.

    In fact, I was in the woods when the winds hit.

    I gave in to what has become a regular weekend urge, and went for a hike Sunday morning. I laced up my now well worn boots, tossed the backpack in the truck and made for Clifty Falls State Park.

  • I am writing today on the topic of the Eminence public pool. The Making Waves Foundation has raised several thousand dollars from the community in an effort to restore our city pool. Shawn Bright said in the newspaper article regarding the restoring of the pool “that was a lot of money for one group of kids.” Since the estimates kept rising out of control, the city pulled the plug on the pool project and now we are left with thousands of dollars and still nothing for the kids to do.

  • Submitted by Deanna Felts

    Prevention Specialist, Seven Counties Services, Inc. Regional Prevention Center

  • When my husband and I first moved to Henry County about ten years ago, we agreed that our little century-old farmhouse, while badly in need of serious upgrading, was nonetheless charming and felt immediately like home. We both loved our mix of woods and pastures, our long winding driveway, and the ponds scattered here and there. What we did not share feelings about was an old barn that stood just sixty yards from a shiny new metal one and directly in view from the house.

  • September 7 through September 13 is Suicide Prevention Week. This is the one topic that many would love not to talk about. It’s one of the elephants in the living room. Why is it that we can talk about alcohol/drugs, breast cancer, heart, diabetes or any other medical problem, yet suicide is one that we can’t or won’t talk about?

    Every 16 minutes someone completes suicide, every 17 minutes someone is left behind to ask, “Why?”

    In Kentucky here are some of the facts about suicide:

  • Over the years, as the number of counties offering alcohol has increased, there has been a greater push by the state to ensure that underage drinkers are being protected.

    It’s been a largely successful effort so far, according to information from the Kentucky Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control (ABC), which has two main programs that ensure those serving alcohol know the law, and know that they are being watched.

  • In recent months there have been a series of reports from state and national organizations that have given us a much clearer picture of Kentucky’s collective health. Unfortunately, their overall assessment is not positive, due largely to problems that are preventable.

    Perhaps the most alarming statistic of all comes from the Kentucky Institute of Medicine, which found that no other state has a higher mortality rate. None of our 120 counties, in fact, is below the national average.

  • “Thanks” to the Eminence City Council for giving its approval for a city-wide yard and garage sale that was held in our community on August 9. This was the first time Eminence had held an event of this nature. In conjunction with the National Garage/Yard Sale Day, things worked well. The NGYSD, is a time when communities work together to reduce, reuse and recycle merchandise that would otherwise be thrown away.

  • When I was growing up on our farm in New York State, my mother called them “blackcaps.” Here in Henry County, we call them “blackberries,” and, while no expert, I am pretty sure they are the same thing.

  • Don’t bother calling it swimming anymore. You might as well call it Phelpsing.

    Many of us, by now, might be tired of hearing Michael Phelps’ name, or seeing him up on the gold medal platform, or hearing that yes, yet again, he’s broken another world record.

    If you blinked the other night, you missed an incredible end to a good race (better even than the 4X100-meter freestyle relay).

  • This is just a note of appreciation for the good job done by the fire departments that responded to the recent fire in New Castle. I would also like to say thanks to the La Grange Fire Department for helping out with preventing the devastating loss of the whole block of buildings.

    Bruce Owens, Director, Henry County Emergency Management

  • For several days I observed a beautiful female ruby-throated hummingbird. She sat just outside my dining room window. I watched as she perched on the branch of an old Mock Orange bush.

  • It is summer time and your teens may have had more free time on their hands. Most of our teens are making healthy choices this summer – like not drinking alcohol. Unfortunately, there are many who choose to drink. Most young people who start drinking before age 21 do so when they are about 13-14 years old. That is why parents and all adults should send a strong message that underage drinking is not okay.

  • Guy Clark had it right. There’s nothing in the world better than a home grown tomato. Nothing.

    We have in our office a wonderful tomato fairy. She brings us bags of tomatoes throughout the summer. Tomatoes of all types find their way into our office, and our tummies, thanks to the hard work of an employee and her family, and their tomato plants’ generous over production.

    I don’t know how far back my love of tomatoes goes, but I can remember eating tomato and mayo sandwiches before I was 10.

  • We the New Castle Lions Club, the Henry County Fair Committee and the Henry County Fair Pageant Committee, all become one large group the weeks before the fair and fair week. We as a group would like to thank all of our generous sponsors for your donations this year. For those of you who thought that we could not put this all together, we succeeded! For those of you who didn’t think we could put on a pageant in a livestock arena, we did it very successfully.

  • Since Kentucky’s students have made significant strides academically over the years, it only makes sense that the schools themselves are also among the nation’s leaders – in this case, when it comes to the cost of operating them.

  • The pickup truck with a bed full of watermelons and cantaloupes was backed up to the curb at the Henry County Farmers Market last Saturday. Its bumper sticker read “Born to Farm.”

    It was Kids Day at the Farmers Market and the children representing local farms indeed seemed born to farm.