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Opinion

  • By John Logan Brent

     

    This week I will highlight Henry County’s roads and a few of the projects that are in the works.

    With well over 200 miles of roads in the county system, there is always work to be done.

    This year’s budget allowed for resurfacing on 17 different roads for a total of 4,150 tons of blacktop laid at a cost of around $275,000. These funds come from taxes on gasoline that we all pay at the pump. The state collects these dollars and remits them based on a formula to each county.

  • By Judge Executive John Logan Brent

    Over the course of the next several weeks I will discuss some of the current happenings in county government. I plan to highlight various Fiscal Court responsibilities including: roads, EMS, parks, animal services, solid waste, economic development and the county budget. We will start this first week with an update on the parks and animal services programs.

  • By Joseph Yates

    I’m sure it’s not news to you that Obamacare (the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act) kicks in soon.

    Many people have questions about the new law but, sadly, the misinformation machine never sleeps. These scare tactics make it hard for folks to get accurate information, particularly when we see rallies of hoodwinked people toting placards that say ”Get your government hands off my Medicare!” on our television news. But let’s go behind the curtains and confront some of these myths.

  • By Jon Park

     

    If there is anything we are learning as we study the last few years, it is not that the Republican Party needs to change or adapt to a changing world, no, it is that we need to do a better job of getting our message out. Henry County is a prime example of that.

    As I talked to Henry Countians at festivals and fairs this summer, we are not that far apart in our political ideology. Henry Countians are conservative.

  • Submitted by
    Harold Bratton

    Joe Yates is my attorney and friend. Sometimes friends don’t agree on things. Joe and I are like oil and water when it comes to our political views.

    I have been reading Joe’s columns since they began appearing in the Henry County Local. During that time I have found myself disagreeing with him more than not. After last week’s column I decided to write a rebuttal.

  • A little over 23 years ago, the seeds were planted.

    The United States was preparing for war in the Middle East; at the time, Operation Desert Shield was underway. A few months later, Operation Desert Storm launched. At the same time, a journalist was born.

  • It took us almost 20 years to find the Unabomber. FBI agent Mark Felt denied for 30 years that he was ‘Deep Throat,’ the source for Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein’s undercover investigation of Nixon and company, until he ‘fessed up in 2005. But today I am proud to announce that, after more than 35 years, we have found Ronald Reagan’s elusive ‘welfare queen.’

  • With Labor Day behind us and a “biting cold and snowy” winter to come – if the Farmers’ Almanac prediction proves correct – the clock is ticking for those of us who would like to see some of what Kentucky has to offer during the fall.

  • President Obama made a wise political move to include the vote of Congress on what action the United States will take against the Assad regime for allegedly using chemical weapons on women and children in Syria.

  • Friday, Sept. 13, will be an historic day in Henry County. That evening, both of Kentucky’s United States Senators — Mitch McConnell and Rand Paul — along with 4th District United States Congressman Thomas Massie, Kentucky Commissioner of Agriculture James Comer, State Senators Ernie Harris and Paul Hornback, State Representative David Osborne and other area Republican leaders will all come out to Pendleton for a multi-county Grand Ol’ Party Rally.

  • The General Assembly returned to re-draw the geographic lines that govern the 100-member House and the 38-member Senate.
    It’s something we and every other state are called upon to do each decade, to reflect the differences in population found by the Census.

  • Hello. I’m Paul Hornback, and I am honored to be your new state Senator, representing Carroll, Henry, Shelby and Trimble Counties, as well as part of Jefferson.
    You may be wondering how this has happened, especially since my friend, Senator Ernie Harris, has served you well, so let me explain.  After each U.S. Census, it is the Constitutional duty of the state legislature to realign voting districts according to population shifts.  This week, we did just that as the Senate and the House passed legislation that drew new district lines.

  • By Joseph Yates

     

  • By Jon Clark

    Monday, the General Assembly began a special session called by Governor Beshear, to finish what should have been done a year ago. Redistricting. The Governor hopes the special session, which will cost over $60,000 a day, will only last five days, to “minimize the cost to taxpayers.”

    By law, the Commonwealth must reassess census data, and move House, Senate and Judicial districts as the population moves, so that districts have about the same population, across the state, to assure balanced representation.

  • In today’s data-driven age, there is no shortage of comparative lists that states can use to check the progress they’re making.  The rankings may not shed much light individually, but when enough are brought together, a much clearer picture begins to emerge.
    With that in mind, Kentucky and 14 of her fellow southern states got a chance earlier this summer to see how each stacks up in some especially crucial areas.

  • By Joe Yates

  • We may be a little more than halfway through 2013, but in Washington and state governments across the country, the focus is increasingly on federal actions taken in 2011.
    The issue can be summed up in one word: sequestration.

  •  I latched onto music at the same time my interest in literature exploded.

    Everyone has their own taste in music and literature, and each genre serves an individual purpose. I relax listening to Chopin or Nick Drake and rock out to the Rolling Stones or the Black Keys. When it comes to country though, I don’t put on this terrible pop fluff that everyone calls new country. My attendance at the Froggy Field Party 5 confirmed that. 

  •  

    Over the years, I’ve rented many apartments and a house or two. If I’d known then what I learned Monday night during the Pleasureville City Commission meeting, I surely could’ve gotten a break on my rent.

    For example, any time I’d not spent every day in the place I was renting, my landlord should’ve given me a break.

    I also learned that simply by cleaning the apartment once a week, my landlords could have taken a little more off.

  • By Jon Park

     Saturday I traveled to Western Kentucky to a political junkie’s Woodstock—Fancy Farm.

    The St. Jerome Catholic Church Picnic, in Fancy Farm, Kentucky, began in 1880. Happy Chandler is credited for making it the political event it has become known as today, when he visited the picnic in 1931, campaigning for lieutenant governor.  He won that year, and believed Fancy Farm was his good luck charm, so he kept going back.