.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Opinion

  •  

    Over the years, I’ve rented many apartments and a house or two. If I’d known then what I learned Monday night during the Pleasureville City Commission meeting, I surely could’ve gotten a break on my rent.

    For example, any time I’d not spent every day in the place I was renting, my landlord should’ve given me a break.

    I also learned that simply by cleaning the apartment once a week, my landlords could have taken a little more off.

  • By Jon Park

     Saturday I traveled to Western Kentucky to a political junkie’s Woodstock—Fancy Farm.

    The St. Jerome Catholic Church Picnic, in Fancy Farm, Kentucky, began in 1880. Happy Chandler is credited for making it the political event it has become known as today, when he visited the picnic in 1931, campaigning for lieutenant governor.  He won that year, and believed Fancy Farm was his good luck charm, so he kept going back.

  • By Candy Clarke

    Why on earth do we go out on a hot day with mosquitoes buzzing us and tiring ourselves picking berries? It would be so much easier just to purchase them at the grocery store. And it certainly would be less work. Why do we do it? Because they’re blueberries!

    It would be different if it was berry picking for the wonderfully delicious blackberries grown in Kentucky. Never mind the chiggers, the heat, and snakes; blackberries are worth all the inconveniences.

  • You will find in this week’s issue my one tank trip to Shaker Village of Pleasant Hill.

    Shaker Village isn’t exactly somewhere one would go to for a high-octane night on the town or expect to find anything on the cutting edge. I refute that expectation. Shaker Village gives something new to the visitor each time they visit.

    The Shakers stood on the cutting edge of technology when it came to farming and household goods. We all know that, but the less commonly known cutting edge elements of their culture lies in their society.

  • By Joseph Yates

  • "Can I ask you a question about the Trayvon Martin thing?”

    Sure.

    “That happened in Florida. Why are they rioting in Los Angeles? Sometimes I think they just like to riot out there.”

    Why? Principle.

    Because had the tables been reversed, the shooter might still be sitting in jail.

    Because racism in this country still is very, very much alive.

    Because a kid went to the convenience store for iced tea and candy and didn’t return home.

  • By John Parks

    Growing up, my dad subscribed to Popular Mechanics. I loved going through the issues and seeing the things that would be around when I became an adult. The issues predicted things like hover cars, personal jet packs and condos on the moon. I’m still waiting for my jet pack.

    Something that is more startling, and grounded in reality, is what Henry County will look like in the year 2050.

  • By Candy Clarke

    Some stories are just meant to be told. Some grow more outlandish each time they are repeated.  As listeners, we often are left wondering what to believe and what not to believe.

  • By Joseph Yates

     

    “Heaven goes by favor. If it went by merit, you would stay out and your dog would go in.”

    That old saying is attributed to Mark Twain. Obviously, he was never around that trembling, drooling little chihuahua that would perch atop the arm of my aunt’s couch when we would visit, yapping loudly and incessantly at nothing in particular, and irritating everyone (but my aunt) to no end.

  • In this issue, I wrote a story about Port Royal Baptist Church.

    I conducted interviews, collected anecdotes and researched the church’s history.

    What I hope comes out of the story is what a foundation a church can serve in a rural community.

    I don’t dare write a persuasive argument for your attendance, but I write this out of my own gratitude.

    I don’t think I would be the same person I am today without growing up in a church.

    The church served so many purposes in my childhood and my community.

  • By Jon Park

    As I sit to write this, it is July 4, Independence Day. I am reminded that 237 years ago, 56 men who put their John Hancock to a piece of paper, signing what could have been their death warrant.

    Those now famous words: “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.”

    Powerful words.

  • At the end of each legislative session, there is understandably a lot of discussion about what the General Assembly has passed.

    Although not given as much fanfare, the early to middle part of summer is an important period as well, because – other than those relatively rare cases when there is a specific enactment date or an emergency clause – that is when all legislation actually takes effect. This year, that date fell on June 25.

  • Upon returning to our home in North Pole, Ala., after wintering in Henry County; we were invited to go halibut fishing with our friends, Rusty and Marie, on their boat. A week on the water? We hadn’t even unpacked our clothes! It took only a few seconds for me to say yes to the invitation. Really, now, who would hesitate more than a few seconds on an offer like that? A few quick loads of laundry; a night’s sleep and we were good to go.

  • Obama’s honeymoon just expired. I might be a little late to the party, but trust me I brought a gift.

    The recent NSA’s circus/scandal with its estranged young bride Eric J. Snowden has even received criticism from of all people Russian President Vladimir Putin. Putin said he didn’t want to deal with the Snowden issue because, “It’s like shearing a piglet — too much squealing, too little wool.”

  • By Joe Yates

     

    How can they be so wrong one day and so right the next? The key here is the word ‘they’—it generally means four versus four, with Justice Anthony Kennedy making the difference.

  • By Joe Yates

  • By Candy Clarke

    No, this isn’t an attack on parents or the school system. It is simply a question loaded with a great deal of concern and based on years of personal observation. As adults, whether or not we are biological parents, we need to ask ourselves some serious questions.

  • I wrote a story about the Henry County Commerce Park and economic development a few issues ago.

    Budget restraints continuously challenge small towns and stand as one of the greater hurdles on the development obstacle course. I heard from many sources that a small budget limited the county, the towns and more widely local merchants from drawing business here.

  • By Joe Yates

    Even at dusk it was still a bit muggy, and when you looked way down Main Street toward the old school, the air above the pavement shimmered. But the heat of the day was dissipating, becoming bearable again, and the youngster — say about 14 — leaned back against one of the cast iron columns buttressing the storefront of the New Castle Pool Hall, and lit a cigarette. Life was good, and although the kid wasn’t old enough to understand a notion of this sort, he did not have a care in the world.

  • By Joe Yates

     

    Like the drone of a furnace in the background, pretense has trickled out of our nation’s capital for so long that no one ever pays much attention. The steady hum of hypocrisy is just a mundane fact of life. Recently, however, the posturing has become downright circus-like.