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Farm and Family

  • Protect family from tick bites, season here soon

    As I was fishing last weekend, I had a thought, “Ticks are going to be here soon.”

     It was a thought that I did not want to deal with especially since I have had to deal with antibiotics and attached ticks in the past. It also wasn’t until I found a few attached ticks with the distinct “bull’s eye” that I really started to care about ticks.

  • Program rewards county 4-Hers

    4-H encourages young people to set and achieve their goals. To that end, the Kentucky 4-H Achievement Program was created to reward ambitious and accomplished young people throughout the state.

    In the highly competitive 4-H Achievement Program, young people receive recognition and prizes for their accomplishments in 4-H and their community. 4-Hers can start accumulating points as soon as they start 4-H and begin earning recognition in the sixth grade.

  • WBFP accepting applications

    SUBMITTED BY WENDELL BERRY CENTER

    Applications for the Wendell Berry Farming Program of Sterling College, in Henry County, are being accepted through April 1.

    This no-tuition, hands-on, undergraduate, sustainable agriculture degree program is open to students who will have earned 60 college credits by Aug. 25, when the program starts.

    Applicants must have a strong work ethic, demonstrate a commitment to sustainable farming and a desire to work to strengthen rural communities.

  • How to prevent tetanus when banding bulls

    In the United States, more than 17 million bulls, which range in age from one day to one year, are castrated yearly. Tetanus is a potentially life-threatening neurologic disease affecting all species of domestic livestock, including cattle, so it’s important for producers to take steps to prevent it.

  • 4-Hers receive full Capitol experience

    Last Tuesday twelve Henry County 4-Hers made their way to Frankfort for the 4-H Capitol Experience.

    The day began with a discussion led by Robert Jenkins, the Deputy Director for Committee and Staff Coordination. He explained how the Legislative Research Commission works with legislators to write potential bills based on the information given to them by the legislator. It is a quick turnaround with LRC bill drafters only having two to three days to write the proposed bill.

  • Student: Why you should invest in ag tags

    As a proud member of 4-H, I would like to share a little about what 4-H means to me and why it is important to our community. I am involved in the Livestock Club. These 4-H programs provide me and my fellow 4-H members skills that are vital to our success in today’s global society. I know 4-H will help me to learn valuable lessons and provide me with opportunities that I would not be exposed to otherwise.

  • Student: Why you should invest in ag tags

    Submitted by Mason King

    Henry County Middle School

    As a proud member of 4-H, I would like to share a little about what 4-H means to me and why it is important to our community. I am involved in the Livestock Club. These 4-H programs provide me and my fellow 4-H members skills that are vital to our success in today’s global society. I know 4-H will help me to learn valuable lessons and provide me with opportunities that I would not be exposed to otherwise.

  • Introducing horses to lush spring pastures

    Spring isn’t that far away, and guess what? That means cool season grasses are starting to explode with growth.

    The spring growth provides excellent forages for horses, but the quick change in diet can cause issues in your horses. Horses that have been fed hay all winter have adapted their gut microbes to break down more fibrous material, and the lush pastures are low in fiber compared with cured hay. This means that the spring lush pastures can easily upset your horses’ stomachs because the horse was not accustomed to eating fresh pastures for months.

  • Introducing horses to lush spring pastures

    Spring isn’t that far away, and guess what? That means cool season grasses are starting to explode with growth.

    The spring growth provides excellent forages for horses, but the quick change in diet can cause issues in your horses. Horses that have been fed hay all winter have adapted their gut microbes to break down more fibrous material, and the lush pastures are low in fiber compared with cured hay. This means that the spring lush pastures can easily upset your horses’ stomachs because the horse was not accustomed to eating fresh pastures for months.

  • HC Homemakers, cultural ribbon results

    The Louisville Area Homemakers Cultural Arts contest was held this past Friday at the Bullitt County Cooperative Extension Service. Henry County homemakers entered items in 20 categories.