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Farm and Family

  • Henry County homemakers scoop up awards at KEHA

    Nearly 600 members of the Kentucky Extension Homemaker Association from across the state converged on the Crowne Plaza Hotel in Louisville recently to celebrate their achievements.

  • Fruit trees join other Kentucky crops

    Are your garden and fruit trees struggling? If they aren’t, you might be one of the lucky few in the state of Kentucky.
    Like many years, vegetable and fruit crops are fighting off viral, bacterial and fungal diseases.
    The wet, cool spring has created the perfect conditions for plant diseases.
    The Kentucky Plant Disease Diagnostic lab has been processing numerous samples, and released a report of the most viewed disease this year.
    Some of those diseases include anthracnose, common leaf spot, fire blight, leaf blight, cedar-apple rust, pythium root/crown rot and fusarium.

  • Henry County homemakers scoop up awards at KEHA

    Nearly 600 members of the Kentucky Extension Homemaker Association from across the state converged on the Crowne Plaza Hotel in Louisville recently to celebrate their achievements.

  • Test forage for nutrients: energy, protein, fiber and minerals
  • Stay fit to save money, retain brain health and live longer

    At one time or another, we have all heard that exercise has benefits.
    Some of the most common benefits we tend to hear about are how exercise can help lower your risk for chronic diseases such as heart disease, stroke and diabetes, but the benefits only start there.
    It may sound funny that exercise can save you money, but a study published in The Journal of the American Heart Association shows that it does. Study participants who engaged in moderate exercise for at least 30 minutes a day for five days a week had significantly lower health care costs compared to those who did not.

  • Stay fit to save money, retain brain health and live longer
  • A quick tour through the garden can limit disease, pests

    Even though almost none of our crops are in the ground yet because of the cold spring, I expect to receive numerous questions about plant disease and insect damage — it happens every day.
    These calls can be about anything from brown rot on grapes to alfalfa weevil control and all kinds of topics in between. Probably eight out of 10 calls, my first question will be, “When did you start noticing this problem?”and usually the answer will be, “Today!”

  • Good hygiene best bet to prevent foodborne illness

    We have heard a lot about diseases transmitted through foods lately and two very important things you can do to protect yourself are washing your hands and your food preparation surfaces often.
    Foodborne bacteria can’t be seen, tasted or smelled. These microorganisms can make you sick if ingested and they spread through contact with cutting boards, utensils, countertops and food, so be ready and clean.
    Here are some tips from the Partnership for Food Safety Education:

  • 4-H students in Forestry Judging Field Day for first time

    On Monday, April 23, four 4-H members from Henry County competed in the State 4-H Senior Forestry Judging Field Day held at Bernheim Arboretum and Research Forest.
    This was the first year Henry County has had representation at the competition and included Ethan Dockter, Cody Dzurenka, Tommy Garrison and Emma Noe.
    This judging event provides teens ages 14 to 18 years old the opportunity to demonstrate their forest knowledge while developing leadership skills.
    An appreciation of trees and their role and importance in our environment is acquired while preparing for the competition.

  • Ticked off? Mild winter increases insect numbers this year

    Unfortunately, this cold weather hasn’t slowed down the ticks.
    They are out, and this year’s mild winter could have increased the amounts of ticks.
    Just remember, tick season is here, and you need to prepare yourself when in the outdoors.
    Ticks can be found anywhere from tall grass fields, woodland areas and your backyards.
    There are three common types of ticks in Kentucky; the lone star tick, American dog tick and blacklegged tick.
    These ticks will feed on humans, many mammals and multiple birds and can carry certain diseases.