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Local News

  • Goodloe moves to the other side of the curtain

    Frank Goodloe III always wanted to sing and act. Now he has the chance to make a difference producing, directing and choreographing Broadway shows as performance and visual arts director for Jewish Community Center’s CenterStage musical theater in Louisville.
    Recently appointed to the new post after holding an interim position, the Henry County native didn’t know whether he would like the “other side of stage” until he stepped in to help after the artistic director left in the middle of last year’s season.

  • Market glut threatens milk producers

    Kentucky Bluegrass Genetics of Eminence hopes it has found the formula to continue operating its dairy farm as the industry feels the impact of depressed prices and increased competition, according to the farm’s co-owner.
    Recently named the Dairy Farmers of America (DFA) Member of Distinction, Mideast region, Lisa Gibson noted her farm has been working hard to diversify its services during a difficult time for milk producers.

  • Rosen Lobbies for hemp

    Chad Rosen of Victory Hemp Foods in Campbellsburg continues to be at the forefront of the effort to legalize hemp as a cash crop for farmers. This time, Rosen was among the industry leaders who met with Sen. Mitch McConnell before the Senate majority leader announced he would file a bill involving the legal status of the crop. “McConnell’s hemp bill intends to remove Industrial Hemp from the Controlled Substance Act and move the task of administering the program to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, which is where it belongs,” Rosen said.

  • New lawn equipment dealer is on the ‘cutting edge’

    A Defoe business owner plans to use his skills working on heavy equipment to provide cutting edge sales and service for lawn care needs.
    Marlin Miller’s original plan involved opening a custom welding and equipment repair shop, but he then heard from neighbors in Defoe they needed someone who could provide dependable service for their mowing equipment.
    As a result of that input, Miller recently opened Cutting Edge Farm and Lawn at 9160 Castle Highway, where he will offer sales and service equipment.

  • A spontaneous show of support for schools
  • Educators take legislators to school in Frankfort rally
  • Egg Scramble

    Dozens of children enjoyed a chilly sunny day at the Henry County Recreational Park on Saturday. The Henry County Baptist Association sponsored the inaugural event and contributed more than 4,000 eggs filled with candy and toys. Thirteen churches participated.

     

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  • Fletcher will always have a seat at C-burg council

    Jan Fletcher will continue to have a seat at Campbellsburg City Council as colleagues decided to honor the former mayor’s many contributions.
    Fletcher, who served as an elected city official for more than 12 years, died in February, and fellow Council member David Gray suggested a way to remember him at the March 19 city meeting.

  • Schools aid homeless students

    Homeless children are everywhere — even in Henry County. Local schools continue trying to make sure their hardships aren’t compounded by those children missing out on class, too.
    Educators say 22 of Henry County Public School young people are homeless, while 93 out of 377 students in Eminence Independent Schools are without fixed, regular and adequate nighttime lodging, the key measure of homeless youth. Once a child is determined homeless, aid kicks in — shelter assistance, clothing and food donations, counseling, job placement for adults and economic education for the families.

  • Grand jury indicts fugitive in March chase

    Even though he remains at large after leading police on a high-speed pursuit March 9, a 26-year-old Smithfield man has been indicted by the Henry County grand jury based on the incident.
    Zachary D. Ethington allegedly fled after Campbellsburg’s police officer, Tony Rucker, got behind a white sedan and turned on his blue lights for an ordinary traffic stop.
    Rucker had noticed that neither the male driver nor the female passenger were wearing their seatbelts at the time.