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Today's News

  • New information details Henry County man’s sex abuse charges

    Editor’s note: This is a graphic story. Please proceed with caution when reading to young children or to anyone reading who could be triggered by stories of sexual assault.

    An Eminence man was in Henry County Circuit Court again this week for a preliminary hearing on his sexual abuse and kidnapping charges.

  • Louisville man arrested after shooting into a parked KSP cruiser in Sulphur

    UPDATE:

    A Louisville man was arrested by the Kentucky State Police after shooting into a cruiser parked in Sulphur.

    Elijah Malik Bellaphant, 22, was being held at the Jeffersontown Police Department after police suspected him of receiving a stolen 2016 Jeep and allegedly shooting two handgun rounds into a KSP cruiser in the driveway at KSP Trooper Jim Phelps.

  • NamUs hopes to connect families with missing persons

     

    A Henry County family has been frantically searching for their 39-year-old since February and even though they feel they haven’t had much help, they remain positive.

    And a program, new to the area, might be their saving grace.

  • Eminence students bring food and money to Help Center

    By Tammy Shaw
    news@hclocal.com
    Eminence Middle School held a celebration recently to honor nine eighth-graders who found a need — to feed hungry people — and created a campaign to collect peanut butter for the Henry County Help Center (HCHC) to distribute.
    The Lead2Feed Student Leadership Program recognizes students who excel in leadership. At the end of school in May, the 501(c)(3) nonprofit recognized the students’ leadership efforts and awarded their designated charity, HCHC, a $1,000 grant.

  • Retirement for firefighter not an end to service

     

    Firefighters across the nation buck conventional wisdom. They run towards blazes, not away. Phil Schaad was one of those people for 45 years. 

    For decades, he risked his life not for a paycheck, but to voluntarily help other families going through one of the toughest moments of their lives.

    Schaad’s hunger to help others began at 6 years old when his own home caught fire after a lightning strike. 

  • Worship leader launches new traveling ministry

    Dave Stahl sang his first solo in church when he was eight years old. He caught the music bug and has been singing ever since.
    Stahl said he’s been called to do two things in his life: teaching agriculture at Henry County High School and “sharing the gospel of Jesus Christ through music.”
    When Stahl came to Henry County in 1982, it didn’t take long for him to establish himself in music and teaching.

  • Pleasureville gem: Forest Hill house

    The Henry County Historical Society Facebook page has gotten a lively response from the Historic Homes articles I’ve written, with comments that sometimes lead to other investigations. One of the respondents this summer was a fellow Centre grad from several years earlier, Dr. William F. Pollard, Jr.

  • A life well lived

    Robert Yount worked hard for 59 years, farming and driving heavy equipment for construction projects, but after two heart attacks and open-heart surgeries, Yount is ready to relax a little.

    About 15 years ago, Yount started collecting antique tractors. His father had steam boilers, and Yount “fooled with steam all my life.”

    Yount took his engines to shows across the county until a “bad heart attack” on New Year’s Eve over a year ago caused him to reflect.

  • Eminence man faces new sexual assault charges

    An Eminence registered sex offender is in jail after police say he kidnapped three children and forced them to do tasks around his home while sexually abusing one of them in front of the others. And after his court appearance on Monday, he is now facing new charges.

    Roderick D. Whitney, 51, is accused of sexually abusing and imprisoning a 17-year-old girl, as well as showing her pornographic material.

  • Henry County EMS feels nationwide worker shortage at home

    Henry County is reeling from the effects of a nationwide Emergency Management Services employee shortage.

    As the rural EMS workforce has decreased, the responsibilities and educational requirements have increased, according to the Rural Health Information Hub.

    Limited funding, expanding coverage areas and a cultural shift in volunteerism have caused quite a problem in the rural areas in the nation, including Henry County.

    These days, it’s hard to attract qualified people due to low levels of pay and high requirements, according to Judge-Executive John Logan Brent.