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Opinion

  •  Growing up in a small town, I cut my reading teeth on community newspapers like this one. That’s why this summer, I’m excited to be interning with the Henry County Local.

  • Most, if not all, of us have someone we know that has been touched by cancer. If you’d like a way to remember your loved ones lost, honor surviors and raise money to help the American Cancer Society, Relay For Life is a good way to show your support.

    Relay for Life is staffed and coordinated by volunteers in thousands of communities and 27 countries. Volunteers give their time and effort to take action against cancer.

  • As some of you may know, I grew up in a military family. My father was career Army and after retirement taught ROTC in a public high school.
    My brothers hoisted the flag each morning at our home. When it rained or snowed, we took the flag down. When it became soiled or frayed, we replaced it.
    The flag, any flag, is a symbol. It wasn’t really the flag we respected by treating it with care, but the idea of the United – yes, united States, its promise, its freedoms and its fallen.

  • February marks American Heart Month, a time when people are encouraged to take charge of their health and enact a heart-healthy lifestyle to help reduce the risk of heart disease and stroke. In the United States, heart disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women. And while several factors can increase a person’s risk for developing heart disease, Kentuckians in particular are vulnerable because of our high smoking rates, which are among the highest in the nation.

  • It is said that Kentucky is a poor state and, for many areas of the state, that is true. But poverty is not something peculiar to Kentucky. Neither is hunger. 

  • Over 200 years ago, our Founding Fathers put their lives on the line to create a new country in which freedom reigned. These men had a vision of a nation unafraid to face its enemies and win. We, the people of the United States, have faced insurmountable odds since our young country’s conception but continue to fight for our God-given rights unique to the United States of America.

  • The one characteristic of “local” government that I think citizens most appreciate is accessibility. In a day of automated operators, telephone prompts and websites, it is refreshing to call a number, get a friendly person on the other end and have your question answered.  
    It is equally nice to be able to walk into an office without an appointment and have someone that you know, or at least know of, assist you with your business, questions and problems.  

  • The 2017 session of the Kentucky General Assembly is now history, and with its conclusion comes the consideration of what was accomplished, both good and bad, and how the adoption of these policies will play out for the future of the Commonwealth.
    It was a busy session, with 793 bills introduced overall, and 203 approved by both chambers.

  • There’s a lot of talk these days about fake news.
    There’s even a Wikipedia page for fake news, which of course, could be fake itself.

  • All invited to pray for addiction recovery efforts
    In the face of tremendous pain and suffering caused by drug use, the pastors of Henry County have come together, forming an initiative to consider a response filled with both grace and truth.
    Our desire is to affirm all life as sacred, that no one is too far gone, that no soul is beyond saving. We know this because we are not perfect ourselves. Ministers stand in the need of the same grace.

  • On some anniversaries we celebrate. On others we reflect.
    The 15th anniversary of the attack on America and New York’s World Trade Center is one of the times for reflection. There is truly nothing to celebrate in the extraordinary tragedy of 9/11.
    As much as I would like to forget some of them, the images from that day will never be out of my mind, nor will the victims and their families.
    But there is one memory I want to hold on to, one that I want to cherish as the deepest and most lasting of Sept. 11, 2001.

  • I have, at times, been accused of being a Pollyanna. It’s not an overly offensive name to be called, especially in light of the fact I’ve been called much worse.

    As a noun, Pollyanna means “an excessively or blindly optimistic person.” As an adjective, the descriptor takes a bit of a turn, being “unreasonably or illogically optimistic.”

  • Some of Kentucky’s most successful academic programs take place, oddly enough, when the school year is over.

    Several of these got their start in the 1980s, and they have since given thousands of our brightest middle and high school students a chance to come together in a college setting and learn in ways that often extend beyond the traditional classroom.

    The Governor’s Scholars Program (GSP) is perhaps the most well-known of these. It began in 1983 and now serves more than 1,100 students each summer over several campuses across the commonwealth.

  • When I attended college at the University of Cincinnati following the path of least resistance to earn my English degree with a minor in journalism, my fourth-floor walkup studio apartment stood just across from the campus in the crowded neighborhood at the corner of Clifton and McMillan streets. It featured a healthy business district that catered to students and fraternity members.

  • By Jesse Harp, Intern

    “There’s nothing wrong with women having children, taking care of their homes and being domestic. That’s what they were created for, after all.”

    Something shattered inside of me when I heard these words come from a girl in one of my classes my first year of college. Suddenly every nuance of sexism I’ve experienced in my life was tossed onto the shore of my conscience by a new wave of passion.

  • As it has for nearly two-and-a-half centuries, our nation will pause on Monday to celebrate its “birthday,” commemorating a time 240 years ago when the Founding Fathers declared our independence.

    Since July 4, 1776, we have weathered a war for our freedom, a war against ourselves, and wars against those who would like nothing more than to see us and our values falter. Although the world has changed in countless ways since Thomas Jefferson penned the Declaration of Independence, our commitment to protect and promote freedom has never wavered.