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Opinion

  • Regardless of the subject, it seems we always want to know how we stack up. 
    It happens on the playing field and in places like the classroom.  It also takes place among the states as they try to gain any kind of competitive edge.
    Each year, an annual publication known as “State Rankings” gives us a scorecard, so to speak, by compiling more than 500 lists that cover a variety of areas, from agriculture and education to health and the economy.  This provides a much clearer picture of what appears to be working and where improvement may be needed.

  • The young bird dropped from the tree. I’m sure the bird would claim that he had flown from the tree. I will admit that he was flapping his wings as he plummeted toward the ground; but to me, it looked more like a fall than a flight. Whether flight or fall, he seemed happy to be on solid ground.

  • Not a day goes by, and usually not even an hour, when we don’t face the considerable challenge of waiting for something or somebody. Waiting in a checkout line. Waiting for everyone to gather for a meeting or a lunch appointment. Waiting at a traffic light. Waiting in a doctor’s office. The list could go on and on, and those are just the relatively harmless forms of waiting. I’m sure you can think of other instances that are much more challenging and even frightening.

  • By John Logan Brent
    Henry County Judge-Executive

    Fiscal Court recently approved two option agreements that would move the county owned Commerce Park toward my personal vision of an Ag Commerce Park.

    The two businesses with plans to locate are The Milkhouse Creamery and Rabbit Hole Distillery. They will join Trackside Butcher Shoppe as an occupant and be a neighbor to Victory Hemp which is located next to the park.

    One thing that all of these businesses have in common is that they support local farms and add value to their crops and livestock.

  • By Michael R. Duncan
    Pastor Emeritus

    Life keeps surprising me. It started early. When I was in the second grade, I sat behind Vinus “Bo” Kelly, who was a big boy. Our teacher regularly used the blackboard (a slate board on which she wrote with chalk). Because Bo was big, I had trouble seeing the board. When I asked to be moved to a different seat so that I could better see the board, the teacher thought I had a vision problem. She sent a note home to my parents telling them I needed to have my eyes checked. I was surprised. Bo was my problem, not my eyes.

  • By John Logan Brent

    Henry County Judge-Executive

    Monday night Fiscal Court entered into an option agreement to sell land at the Henry County Commerce Park to Rabbit Hole Distilling for the purpose of building a barrel warehouse.

    This is a significant formal step toward Rabbit Hole making Henry County their home. Discussions about Rabbit Hole and distilleries have been the buzz in the county for the last month. It has been a long time since I have had so many calls from so many passionate people about a single subject.

  • Recently, a local business owner I’ve never met offered to buy my staff’s lunch last Friday to show support for their local newspaper after what happened in Annapolis. I was completely taken aback by her kind gesture. We can’t accept gifts or meals but the call alone meant the world to us.

  • By Carilynn Coombs

    A Modern Milkmaid, LLC

    Editor’s note: This column originally appeared on www.amodernmilkmaid.com.

    Last night, the Milkman, along with his parents, went to a town meeting to discuss a distillery potentially coming to our area. Now, if you aren’t familiar with Kentucky....we have a whole lot of bourbon.

  • A few years ago the parents of a friend of mine were given the heartbreaking news that their son, Greg, was going blind, and that nothing could be done. Everyone was torn with pity for them, but they remained calm and uncomplaining. One night, as I left their home, I tried to express my admiration for their courage.

  •  Growing up in a small town, I cut my reading teeth on community newspapers like this one. That’s why this summer, I’m excited to be interning with the Henry County Local.

  • Most, if not all, of us have someone we know that has been touched by cancer. If you’d like a way to remember your loved ones lost, honor surviors and raise money to help the American Cancer Society, Relay For Life is a good way to show your support.

    Relay for Life is staffed and coordinated by volunteers in thousands of communities and 27 countries. Volunteers give their time and effort to take action against cancer.

  • As some of you may know, I grew up in a military family. My father was career Army and after retirement taught ROTC in a public high school.
    My brothers hoisted the flag each morning at our home. When it rained or snowed, we took the flag down. When it became soiled or frayed, we replaced it.
    The flag, any flag, is a symbol. It wasn’t really the flag we respected by treating it with care, but the idea of the United – yes, united States, its promise, its freedoms and its fallen.

  • February marks American Heart Month, a time when people are encouraged to take charge of their health and enact a heart-healthy lifestyle to help reduce the risk of heart disease and stroke. In the United States, heart disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women. And while several factors can increase a person’s risk for developing heart disease, Kentuckians in particular are vulnerable because of our high smoking rates, which are among the highest in the nation.

  • It is said that Kentucky is a poor state and, for many areas of the state, that is true. But poverty is not something peculiar to Kentucky. Neither is hunger. 

  • Over 200 years ago, our Founding Fathers put their lives on the line to create a new country in which freedom reigned. These men had a vision of a nation unafraid to face its enemies and win. We, the people of the United States, have faced insurmountable odds since our young country’s conception but continue to fight for our God-given rights unique to the United States of America.

  • The one characteristic of “local” government that I think citizens most appreciate is accessibility. In a day of automated operators, telephone prompts and websites, it is refreshing to call a number, get a friendly person on the other end and have your question answered.  
    It is equally nice to be able to walk into an office without an appointment and have someone that you know, or at least know of, assist you with your business, questions and problems.