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Opinion

  • BY D Wayne Martin

    columnist

    This is a new, monthly column about Henry County’s past, present and future. D Wayne Martin recently retired from UPS Freight in Lexington after 38 1/2 years of work and is now a writer. He is a 1973 grauate of Eminence High School.

    During this time of year many folks–as I do¬think of holidays past. It is my wish that those memories will be of pleasant times.

  • BY Carden Willis and John Inscore Essick

    The Henry County Local is beginning a monthly column we are calling the Henry County Review of Books. Authors Carden Willis and John Inscore Essick will take turns highlighting a book that has happened into their hands and challenged us, inspired us or gotten us talking to each other.

  • The Christmas story most of us learned in church is a combination of stories recorded in the Gospels according to Luke and Matthew. We take what they recorded, which occurred over several months, and neatly package it into one spectacular night.

    Mary and Joseph arrive in Bethlehem . . . Mary gives birth to Jesus . . . Angels sing to shepherds and shepherds come to the manger to see Jesus . . . From far, far away, three Magi (or kings) show up with expensive gifts for Jesus, only to disappear as quickly as they came.

  • One of our country’s great success stories over the past 50 years is the steep decline in deadly auto accidents. Highway fatalities that exceeded 50,000 a year in the early 1970s have since dropped below 40,000, even with significant growth in the number of drivers on the road.

     Kentucky has taken full advantage of this welcome trend. In fact, 2013’s total was the lowest we’ve seen in the commonwealth since the late 1940s.

  • Henry County is beautiful. Residents and visitors alike are amazed by the vistas at every bend in the road—and there are a lot of curves to go around.

    However, many, including me and some leadership classmates who have lived here all their lives, have never seen the entire county.

    I had the privilege to take part in Henry County Chamber of Commerce Leadership 2018, led by Executive Director and eternal optimist Holly Kinderman.

  • With blustery winds and snow flurries sweeping the commonwealth, it’s clear that the holiday season is upon us.  Meanwhile, the members of the General Assembly continue to be hard at work holding Interim Joint Committee meetings in Frankfort and throughout the state as we approach the start of the 2019 Regular Session in January.

  •  by Kevin Kimes

    Pastor of New Castle First Baptist Church

    The Apostle Paul writes: Rejoice always, pray without ceasing, give thanks in all circumstances; for this is the will of God in Christ Jesus for you (1 Thessalonians 5:16–18, ESV).

  • Sherry Crose

    Executive Director

    Honorable Order of Kentucky Colonels

    Many of us think about the charitable organizations we will support as we enter this season of giving. There are numerous options and reasons motivating us. I would like to point out and give thanks to the active Kentucky Colonels, both living in the commonwealth and from around the world, who support our Good Works Program.

  • November brings cooler temperatures and the first hints that winter is just around the corner. The month also contains my favorite holiday —Thanksgiving. It has been my favorite holiday since I was a child; and I had fully intended for this article to focus on my joy of Thanksgiving.

    As I wrote this, my primary emotion was not thanksgiving. I’m not sure there was a primary emotion. Instead of one emotion, I was experiencing several—anger, fear, anxiety, sadness and disgust, to name a few.

  • November brings cooler temperatures and the first hints that winter is just around the corner. The month also contains my favorite holiday —Thanksgiving. It has been my favorite holiday since I was a child; and I had fully intended for this article to focus on my joy of Thanksgiving.

    As I wrote this, my primary emotion was not thanksgiving. I’m not sure there was a primary emotion. Instead of one emotion, I was experiencing several—anger, fear, anxiety, sadness and disgust, to name a few.

  • Information provided by news publishers is essential to our democracy. And now more than ever, it’s important to remind our political leaders of the critical role we play in society.

     In the upcoming mid-term elections, much is at stake. News consumption skyrockets, yet newspapers have experienced years of revenue decline. We need leaders in Congress who will aid us in not only supporting our editorial independence, but our financial independence – we cannot continue to be the voice of the people if we can no longer invest in delivering high-quality news.

  • I’m not a big fan of politics.
    Yes, I’m a newspaper reporter, whose job is to inform the public about what’s happening in this county, but here’s why I dislike the political process.
    The political stance taken by voters (and non-voters for that matter) is a belief, not to be confused with the verifiable, fact-based truth. It’s a gut feeling supported by partisan voices, as politicians get into she-said, he-said circular arguments.
    If you’ve ever tried to sway a family member or friend to your specific political point of view, you know how stubborn people get. Most have stopped trying.

  •  FRANKFORT – With fall finally feeling like it has arrived, farmers across the country are in full swing as they wind down another growing season.  Although we are surrounded by farmland, we may sometimes forget that, as a profession, farmers are an elite group.

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    What are you going to do when Jesus doesn’t play by the rules . . . when he doesn’t behave as a good Christian should? Well, the safest thing to do is to reshape Jesus in our image.  

  •  Since 1920, all Americans–despite race or gender–have been given arguably the most important right as citizens: the ability to vote.

    On Nov. 6, Henry Countians will have the ability to vote in state and county elections. 

    OK, so who should you vote for in the state and county election?

     

  • My earliest memories of reading a newspaper were with my Nana. She always read the “funnies,” as she called the comics first in the paper because she said she liked to start her day with a laugh. 

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    The Steak ‘n Shake on South Hurstbourne Parkway in Louisville was crowded as Donna and I arrived for a Sunday lunch before heading to a children’s quilt show in Jeffersontown. We were given the option of a table by a window or one in the center of the restaurant. We opted for the window.

  • By Mary Berry and Debby Barker

    Originally published in "Civil Eats"

    In 1978, Wendell Berry sounded the alarm about what was happening in farm communities all around the country in the now classic “The Unsettling of America:  Culture and Agriculture.” Unfortunately, the state of agriculture is even worse today.

  • FRANKFORT – There are several holidays each year that are distinctly American – from Memorial Day and the Fourth of July to Thanksgiving – but only one celebrates the hard work that made us who we are: Labor Day.
    It is often seen as the unofficial end to the summer, but it’s important to look beyond that as we celebrate the upcoming three-day weekend.

  • Summer has escaped us.
    Your kiddos are trying to soak up the last bit of pool time after a day of classes. You’re weaving through the Jack-o-lantern-covered aisles of Kroger. And your husband is spending the last of his summer Sunday nights sweating cutting the grass.
    Myself, I’m trying to wrap my head around the fact that my first season in Henry County has already come to an end.
    I started here in May, when the drive along Hwy. 22 to get to our Eminence office was bright at 7:30 a.m. Soon, the same 30-minute commute will be in the dark.